SEP Episode 27: Using Your ‘Why’ To Become a Better Leader, with Anni Keffer

Today we have Anni Keffer on the show. Anni Keffer is the owner of Anni Keffer International, where she consults many different financial planners on how to communicate their value powerfully. She’s also the author of Leadership Built On Why an Amazon bestseller that teaches modern leadership principles to really stand out and have a brand that creates loyalty with your customers and your team in this modern world where everybody is so distracted. She’s also a very accomplished speaker. She’s spoken at many different events and alongside many well-known names like a Kevin Harrington and Seth Godin. She’s done this from a very young age by also being able to use the same principles she explains in her book to communicate her value and set herself apart as an authority. So I hope you enjoy getting a peek into some of Anni’s wisdom with us today.

 

Podcast

Key Takeaways

[2:03] Annie’s first lessons about good leadership

[5:55] Theory and implementing it in a strategic way to your business

[8:00] How to communicate your vision/passion to attract clients, and/or audiences

[11:11] Inspiring your team members to be the best they can be

[16:50] A new and applicable way to lead

[20:28] Anni’s most successful ways to connect with clients

[22:10] What you should invest in for effective social media marketing

[27:12] Time management and focusing on revenue-generating tasks

[29:42] Why play is important to growing your business

 

Links and Resources Mentioned in this Episode

Anni Keffer

LinkedIn

Instagram

Anni Keffer’s Book: Leadership Built On Why

Perry Marshall

 

Transcript

Kyle:

Hello and welcome to The Story Engine podcast. Today we have Anni Keffer on the show
Let’s hand the mic over to her. First of all, thank you so much for joining us and I would love to hear, I’d love beginning the show with this question, but tell me a story about a defining moment in your life that has led you to do what you do today?

Anni:

Thanks, Kyle. I’m really excited and happy to be here. So thanks for having me. I would say defining moment wise to give some background. I grew up with parents who were really great about talking about leadership in the sense that they told me what it meant and then they showed me what it looked like. I quickly realized that there had to be a marriage between both knowledge of leadership and action and you couldn’t really be a leader without either. So I had this great mindset and this great preparation and as I grew up though I started to buy into a lot of the myths and the lies that I had to wait until I was a certain age, or at a certain job, or I had a college degree, or I was achieving some level of success before I could really be a leader.

Anni:

And the other part of that was I was also starting to wait for other people to give me the permission to be a leader. That somebody said, “Okay, now that you are the head of this club or the sports team, or you are this certain person. Now, you can be a leader.” And I was waiting for people to give me that permission. So I started to shrink back and play small though part of me knew that there had to be something wrong with this model. This really couldn’t be the way that it was. And so growing up I really shrunk back and started to think, “Okay, if I can’t be a leader and I have to wait for everybody else to say, ‘Now, is your time,’ then what if I don’t really have a purpose? What if I’m just supposed to kind of hum-drum along and just wait for other people to kind of direct me on this path and do what everyone else told me I should do?”

Anni:

I got to 18, looking ahead to college and career and future and really feeling I was looking at Mount Everest and I had to move it to the left. And that was really for me was my own deep struggle of purpose and “What am I supposed to be doing?” And looking at my generation and realizing that there was a deep need for both leaders that we’re going to talk about leadership and really show us what leadership was. I wasn’t seeing a lot of that happening. So it was six months into my freshman year of college, I’m at my dad’s first seminar and I’m sitting in the back and I was being an intern for the Christmas time, and I remember hearing him and other speakers talk about leadership and business and being successful and what it took.

Anni:

And for the first time in I would say probably my entire life I was feeling really inspired and I was feeling I could do something bigger than I thought I could ever have done. I remember going up to my hotel room at lunch and I looked in the mirror and I just knew at that point for some reason I said, “I want to write a book. I want to write a book for the people coming up behind me so that they don’t have to go through the same things that I did. That they’re able to read it and say, ‘Okay, now I know how I can kind of walk this path as a young person to be able to fully grasp leadership and what my purpose is.'”

Anni:

So I was understanding my ‘why’. I didn’t know it at the time and I couldn’t really define it, but I knew then that things were starting to shift. That was really the defining moment, which launched me into reading about leadership, learning about it, getting coaches, getting trained, doing everything I could to immerse myself in the leadership space so that I could be a better leader for myself and I could be a better leader for those around me and really start to teach what that looked like and how really it could transform your life.

Kyle:

That’s amazing. I love that intersection between reaching out to these people who are looking for meaning and creating a story that inspires them, but also creating the story within yourself. And to start things off, since I think one of the foundational moves that any entrepreneur needs to do or anybody that wants to do something great needs to do is start investing in yourself. And you hinted out a little bit of this. What are some of the investments that you made that you thought were really moved the needle forward for you?

Anni:

Yeah, so at 17 my dad, and I said my dad owns his own business, and my dad and I started going to marketing and business training and really it was interesting of sort of this juxtaposition going to college and going to these trainings and really I had a step, I had a foot in the real world and a foot kind of theory. And I realized the value of not just talking about theory but really talking about what it meant to implement tactics and strategies and things I could literally write down and go home and implement. So I was really understanding how to take the theory part of life and implement it in a way that was strategic and that’s helpful for my own business.


Anni:

I was going to three to four events a year. I got my first coach at 18, which really allowed me to understand how to bring in somebody that was outside myself. We’re kind of in our own lives and we can’t see the forest through the trees. And so they’re able to come in and say, “Hey, what are your biggest problems and concerns, especially in business? And how can I help you move forward, help you to grow both personally and professionally?” So it was going to events that were about marketing and about business. Learning things that were outside my industry. Actually, that was really powerful for me is the more that we can learn outside of our industry, the more we can be different within our own industry.

Anni:

The first fast food restaurant was founded by a guy who went through a bank drive-through and he goes, “Why can’t we do this in fast food?” And so the more that we’re the kind of look outside of our own industry and saying, “How can we change our industry for the better?” I think is really powerful. So it was reading books and getting coaches and getting trained a couple of times a year because we kind of come home and we kind of get in the every day-to-day and sometimes we’re surrounded by negative people or things going on. And when we’re able to remove ourselves from that situation and get surrounded with people who are excited, who are passionate, who are doing things similar to us, I think that’s the way it will grow the most, both personally and professionally.

Kyle:

Since you’ve been investing so much and been showing us a lot of the buildup of what you’ve been doing. Give us a quick idea of what you’re doing in this. Now, you are helping and working with a lot of different brands. Tell us what that looks like and tell us how you can tweak things and examine things within big brands like Coca Cola and maybe even smaller personal brands that you work with those.

Anni:

Yeah. So it’s really about a kind of coming in and understanding where people are at right now. Okay. What are you doing right now? What’s working well? What’s not working well and what’s the big dream and the vision? Because I think a lot of times, we have, especially as entrepreneurs or the people leading the company, right? We have dreams and visions. We have things that we’re excited about. Things that we love. Especially if we founded a company if we’re smaller. We have things that from the beginning there’s a reason there’s a ‘why’ that we started the thing that we do and that we do what we do.

Anni:

A lot of times for people it’s not necessarily that they don’t have the vision or the dream or the why. They have trouble communicating that. They have that passion, but maybe their team members don’t or maybe they don’t understand, and so really one of the biggest things I do when I work with people say like, “Tell me about that dream and that vision and that ‘why’. Let’s write it down. Let’s get passionate about it and let me teach you actually how to communicate it so that your customers, your client’s audience, your people around you are going to be attracted to that,” right?

Anni:

They’re going to be so excited. They’re going to move forward. You’re going to attract the kind of clients that you want because you’re communicating why you do what you do. It’s not, “We sell this, or we do this or we have this product.” It’s, “Hey, I want to leave a legacy. I want to help the people around you leave a legacy,” and those kinds of things are what connects us and what really attracts us to people. So it’s helping them communicate in a way that’s going to help their team get excited, help their team be passionate about the work that they do, and help them attract the right kind of clients that they’re really looking for.

Kyle:

I love that and I think that that’s very powerful and I know it’s going to be difficult for somebody who’s new to these concepts are maybe not so new, but just still working on them to really embrace and understand that without some solid case studies or experience. Do you have a specific story or of a company you made a big impact with and a big change with and can you tell us some about how this process worked out?

Anni:

I’d love to. Richard Coe is in his 70s, so he’s been in the business for quite some time as a financial planner. I was doing a seminar and I talk about this in my leadership talk and what I really break it down is, is you have your ‘why’, right? You’ve defined your ‘why’, you understand what it is now you have to communicate it. And we’ve all been taught, we communicate what we do in, “This is what I do, this is who I am. So I’m a doctor and I do this kind of surgery,” or, “I’m a lawyer and this is the kind of law I practice.” And it’s very basic, very simple. It’s not very connected. And so what I tell them and what I taught him basically was you have to communicate it with what do you believe? So when somebody comes up to you and says, they said, “Hey, Richard, what do you do?”

Anni:

He wouldn’t just say, “Hey, I’m a financial planner who does this kind of planning.” He would say, “Hey, I believe that everybody was meant to leave a powerful legacy. That I didn’t grow up understanding or knowing how my family really didn’t plan for leaving a legacy that they were proud of, and so now I help families create legacies that give back to the community, that make their family proud, that really leaves something that matters in the world.” And I taught Richard how to communicate that to his team members, to his clients, to the people that he was trying to attract.

Anni:

It totally transformed the way not only he saw his business and himself, but it transformed the way he attracted the kind of clients he was looking for. It gave them more joy in the business. It helped his team members to really understand this is why we do what we do. “We come to work every day and we do the daily grind because of this bigger reason because these are the kinds of people that were helping,” and it really allowed them to find more joy in the day-to-day. It helped them to always understand what the bigger goal was. It wasn’t just about numbers, it was about that person that they were helping leave a legacy that they were really proud of it and so it was really just a transformation from the inside out.

Kyle:

I love that and on the topic of communicating value and financial planners, in particular, I think there is a very strong bias in the world of financial planners towards there’s an idea of age equals experience equals authority and for you at a young age, you’re in your 20s. You can disclose exactly wish but I imagine that you’ve had a lot of challenges being so young and trying to make these big moves or work with a very experienced financial planner. How have you been able to communicate your value and probably overcome some of these biases towards younger people and really show, “I can create a lot of value for you and here’s how I can do it?”

Anni:

At 26, people definitely look at me like, “You probably are crazy for thinking that you can do that,” but I think one of the biggest ways I communicated my value was writing my book. I think that was really the way that I could say, “Hey, this is what I do, this is what I believe in and here’s kind of where I wrote it all down. Here’s kind of my manifesto of really what my mission is.” And it allowed them to say like, “She’s not just talking about it, she’s really living it out through the testimonials and just kind of what I’ve written in the book,” and allowed them to see that, it wasn’t just nice on paper that she was really doing something that mattered. So that’s really been a big door opener for me personally just to say, “Hey, if you want to read more about it, you want to learn more about what I’m really passionate about, check out my book and kind of dive into all of that.” That’s really opened the door in a lot of ways.

Kyle:

I think that’s cool. Tell me about your process for writing this book and launching this book and, maybe some other ways for how you use it to market and grow your business right now.

Anni:

So everyone thinks that writing the book is a big thing, right? The big mountain that only certain people, only writers can do. And so I do kind of break that myth down. So when you have to stare at a blank screen, it is one of the most intimidating things because you’re like, “What am I going to write? What do people care about?” And really what I did is I took the leadership talk that I had kind of poured my heart and my soul into and I transcribed it and I really, that was my basis for saying, “Okay, this is what I know to be true. Now how can we dive deeper into these topics?” So here’s like the big 35,000-foot level and then here’s, now let’s break it down a little bit more so that people can kind of dive into it and say, “Okay, now I can actually implement these steps a little bit more.”

Anni:

I’ve used it too. Meet people cold. To send to people. People that I’m looking to meet or create relationships with. Just sending a note, just saying, “Hey look, you really inspire me and I really hope this book inspires you as well.” And so not being afraid to say, “This is something that I put all of my heart and my soul into that I know is really going to change your life as your changing lives. And so I just want to and give it to you as a gift to say thank you for giving so much the world and this is my gift to you in that.”

Kyle:

Oh, I love that. And you mentioned that you built it around a talk that you’ve developed and you’ve had some experience public speaking. We actually met at a workshop which was designed to help people get on more stages and grow their brand through that. Tell me a little bit about your experience of how you’ve gotten into public speaking. Tell me about your talk and kind of your strategy behind your talk and maybe some of the places that you’ve spoken at and maybe even how you got them to speak. Okay.

Anni:

Originally, I didn’t even think public speaking was something that people could do or that was something that was a world that was possible. I just thought, “I can talk a lot and move my hands and maybe do something with it eventually,” but realize it was a great way to speak to large audiences to really get my message out in a bigger way too. To reach a lot of different kinds of people, a lot of different kinds of industries. I started small, doing talks here and there reaching out to people saying, “Hey, can I tag along? Can I work with you at this event?” Did stuff at my dad’s financial planning event, which I have to say it was probably the best start to an audience, a bunch of 50 to 80-year-old men, staring at me thinking, “You’re crazy for being so young doing this,” but it really allowed me to say like, these are people who are very unsure of me and have their arms crossed.

Anni:

I was really able to cross that boundary and realize how to communicate my message in a way that helped them to understand that put it in their own words that really kind of reach them where they were. And that was a big eye-opener meet. And so speaking for conferences like FTLA and there were women’s conferences in Arizona to doing my own events. It was understanding that no matter if I was young, no matter what was going on in the industry, that leadership really takes over all industries. That if you can’t lead well, you can’t really run a company well. And I just realized that there was this deep need for a new way of leadership. So that’s kind of how I pitched it, was understanding about flipping leadership on its head.

Anni:

It’s not about just having one person and then there’s the rest of us. You have to have a great leader that really just, like I said, with Richard, really transformed from the inside out that they have to understand how to motivate and care well for their people and for their audience and do it in an inspiring way that’s built on a bigger reason. We don’t lead to lead. We lead because there are bigger reasons and a bigger mission. So I really talk about flipping leadership on its head and saying, “We have to get the old leadership style out. This is the new leadership style in.” And that’s been what’s opened a lot of doors in terms of speaking for people to say, “Okay, that sounds good. I think that’s what our company and our industry and our conference really needs.”

[bctt tweet=”Don’t lead to just lead. Lead because of the bigger reasons and your deeper mission. -Anni Keffer” username=”kylethegray”]

Kyle:

For all of the leaders out there listening, you’ve got a lot of good insights to share. What are some of the old ways of leadership that we see pervading maybe both small and large companies even personal brands sometimes? What are the big mistakes that people are making as far as leadership? What does the new modern leadership look like these days?

Anni:

Yeah, so it was a couple of the ways I talked about earlier. You have to have a college degree. You have to have a certain kind of job. You have to have a certain status in society, a certain level of success before you can be looked at as a leader. Oftentimes, we think it has to be a certain position and a title and like, “We’re naming you this kind of leader,” or, “You’re kind of over these people.” I think, oftentimes, we can see leadership with management and we think, “Okay, leadership is just managing this group of people. It’s getting these certain tasks done. It’s doing the job description that I saw on Indeed when I applied for the job.” A lot of times what it does is it separates and it says, “Okay, I’m here and the rest of you are here,” that really like, “I’m the leader and I’m the person doing everything else and you guys are just kind of doing the rest of the tasks that need to be done.”

Anni:

It really kind of alienates people from being motivated at their jobs. Most people, especially millennials, are totally disengaged because they just think, “I have to come to work and I have to do the same thing every day, waiting for the clock to start and waiting for the clock to stop.” And I think that the more that leaders are able to work with their people, as I said with Richard, communicating what it is, the why behind why they do what they do is really going to help people get engaged with what they do. Help people be able to communicate that when they’re out with people saying, “Hey, I work for this company. This is their mission. This is why they do what they do.” Just saying, “Okay, this is what I do and I show up to work every day and I hate it.”

Anni:

Really saying, we have to stop making this a leader and you kind of everybody else and bringing everyone together to say, “This is our same mission. We are on the same team, this is who we’re going to do.” Flipping leadership on its head and allowing your people, allowing the people in your company and your audience to reach their goals. So by doing that as a leader, you’re really reaching your own goals. So helping them to understand what it means to push the people around them to their greatest potential. And in that, you reach yours as well.

Kyle:

Wow. That’s strong. You’re reaching a lot of people. You’ve already shared, you’re doing talks, you’re attending events, you’re investing in coaches. And for you, what has been the most successful marketing channel, or it may not even necessarily be a marketing channel. It could just be shaking hands at events, but what’s been the best way for you to connect with your clients? And in a way that’s been driving a lot of growth for your business? What’re the main channels that have been very successful for you?

Anni:

It’s not hand-to-hand combat, right? It’s shaking hands and really connecting in a personal way. Whether that’s through sending … We talked about sending videos at the conference. Sending handwritten thank you notes. Doing things that are personalized in a really depersonalized world. I found that that’s really opened a lot of doors is when you make the actions that you take as personal as possible, that you really connect on a deeper level. And then with that Instagram has been sort of that social media channel has been really massive because it’s allowed to share things that are beautiful and powerful. Things that really matter in a way that really connects with people both visually and in the storytelling manner. I think personal hand-to-hand shaking, making everything I do, sending notes, sending videos very personalized. And then through Instagram, doing storytelling and talking about big concepts, really big things, but doing it in a way that’s very vulnerable and connected and easy for people to understand.

[bctt tweet=”Making a difference is being personal in a depersonalized world. -Anni Keffer” username=”kylethegray”]

Kyle:

That makes a lot of sense. Social media, I’ll admit even to everybody, it’s not something that I’ve spent a lot of time developing a big following on any of the platforms. I’m always fascinated by the many different strategies I hear for it. What’s been your process for growing your Instagram following and connecting with people there, building up relationships through that and who are you really looking for in maybe that case versus hand-to-hand, yeah, strategy?

Anni:

I’ve only done Instagram. I don’t have a massive following. So here’s an interesting idea so that people think, to do Instagram well, to really do any social media channel well you have to have this massive following, right? You have to have 100,000, 500,000, a million. The interesting thing I’ve learned is that even having a small following myself, the biggest thing is how much are you investing in the people that are following you versus how much you’re just looking to grow your numbers? So if you can’t sell your product, you can’t invest in your brand at five people following you, you’re not going to do it at 100,000, you’re not to do it on a million. So it’s really learning to invest in your community and your tribe because they’re showing up to like and to comment and to be there for you.

Anni:

The more that I invest in them that I follow them and I like their pictures and I comment and they interact and I send DMs. That’s really what brings me the most joy. It’s what brings me the most connectedness, what really helps my tribe understand me and helps me understand them. So then eventually I’m able to say, “Hey, I know you guys need this. You guys have been talking about this. I know that this is the best product for you in terms of what I can create for them.”

Anni:

So really it’s not about the size, but it’s about what you invest in them and so people say, “Okay, well that sounds nice, but what does that look like?” So it’s every day, carving out 20 minutes to say, “When I post a picture, whoever comments or likes I’m going to click on them, I’m going to understand who they are and kind of like a couple of pictures that I’m going to comment, I might even send them a DM.” So it’s just really saying, “How can I really get to personally know these people so they know I’m invested, so then they’re going to invest back in me as well?”

Kyle:

I think that’s powerful and that ties in really well with kind of your high-touch strategies as well. And I’d love to hear if you’ve got a specific story, this is something that I actually wrote about. I wrote a book called The College Entrepreneur. That was my first book and it was similar to yours where I was just like, I felt I just had to get this message out. There wasn’t much of a strategy beyond that. But one of my favorite parts of that book is talking to them, especially this generation of like, “Yeah, I walked around and my backpack had a case of little thank you notes that I could just do a little-handwritten things here and there and they’ve opened a lot of doors for me,” and I’d love to hear a story for you. Maybe how there was a handwritten note or a nice personal gesture outside of the common digital marketing Facebook ads, email kind of stuff world that has opened the door, pushed you over the edge or gotten you an advantage that yeah, you may not have otherwise.

Anni:

I was trying to get to know Dawn and she’s the owner of a company here in Pittsburgh that does a lot in the film industry. She’s very high up in that sense. So I wanted to be able to create a relationship and it was kind of I could send an email but even going to read it, she has no idea who the heck I am. So I went and I signed a really personal copy of my book and I signed this thank you note and I was just really was on it. It’s not even about just saying things to say things. It’s about being honest. I looked her up and I understood kind of what she was doing and her mission in the film industry with women, what her passion was. And I really just talked about that in the note and immediately as soon as she got it, got an email that just said, “I cannot thank you enough for what you did in sending this to me and let’s meet up for lunch.”

Anni:

So it was just a way to say it’s not about just making people feel good, it’s about understanding as much as you can, who they are. And then really just highlighting that, right? People want to be recognized for the things that they love and that they’re passionate about. And the more that you can do that in a really genuine and heartfelt way, it’s going to matter, right? Everybody’s into just sending you a quick message or doing something that’s not, it’s personal, but it’s not really personal. I think the more that we can highlight what these people are doing that they really love, they’re going to say, “This person’s paying attention,” right? “They’re not just trying to get something out of me. They really took time and attention to kind of understand who I was and talk to me about that.”

Anni:

I think that’s one of the most powerful things you can do is how can you disconnect from what everyone else is doing and do something that’s going to get someone attention, and handwritten notes, anything handwritten, anything personalized is going to take it over the edge for sure.

Kyle:

I love that, and 100% agree. One of the things that since it’s kind of the New Year and we’ve been talking a lot about different ways to grow your business. I would love to know kind of what you see as important moving forward with your business. What do you think in 2019, either maybe some personal work that you’re doing or a marketing strategy or speaking more, what do you think is going to move the needle for your business in this coming year and how are you going to make that happen?

Anni:

I really think speaking is going to be a big thing. And I think how I’m going to do that. I think as entrepreneurs and business owners, we always look at the big picture and we’re always seeing the 10,000 things on our to-do list that we could do or we should do. And I think really taking time to batch-work on something and really trying to implement is like really cutting down my days to say, “In this two-hour block of time, I’m only going to do this. I’m only going to reach out to people who I want to speak to.” Or, “In this block of time, I’m really going to focus on reaching out to people on Instagram. This block of time, I’m going to write thank you notes.” Doing things that are intentional and that are focused, and that I’m not looking at my phone or my email, or I’m not thinking about the things but I’m really just saying like, “Going to put my head down and really focus on these,” because that’s honestly, that’s the hardest thing for anybody, right?

Anni:

Is really focus on what are revenue generating tasks? What are things that are, like you said, moving the needle forward? What’s going to create a relationship with this person? And it’s really being very intentional and very focused with your time to say, “I’m not going to do anything else but this for two hours.” And even if I didn’t get to my 10,000 person thing to-do lists is that that was really important because it teaches you that these are the big tasks for the week and if I’m going to carve out that time, I think that’s really what moves the needle for it. That’s my focus is every day just having my kind of blocks of time to focus on the things that really matter.

Kyle:

Oh, man, I love that. It reminds me of a book I recently read called Deep Work and kind one of the analogies or metaphors they use is your best work and getting into that work mode and work mind is very similar to sleep. So when we sleep we go through several phases of sleep, but then we go into REM sleep, which is our deepest sleep mode, but it actually takes somewhere between 30 minutes to an hour to actually get to that deepest moment of sleep. And if we were trying to sleep and somebody came in every 15 minutes and asked us a quick question or just looked at our phone every 15 minutes, we’d never get any, any sleep or any good. It’s a lot like that. And that’s always a big discipline that I want to cultivate and work to cultivate as well on a consistent basis. Because I think, yeah, those that can do deep work and those that can invest more time into deep work are the ones that are really going to get ahead in business and in life.

Anni:

And I think we were kind of talking about this with our words for the year of the podcast but really creating time for play. So if anyone knows Perry Marshall, he calls it his renaissance time. So doing things that are not work that are, for you, life-giving allows you to go into your work to do your deepest work, right? So if you carve out time to play and to have fun and to kind of rejuvenate creatively, you’re much more able to focus because you don’t feel deprived. You don’t feel like, “All I do is work. I’m working 24 hours a day and I don’t feel like doing anything that’s fun for me or that’s creating relationships or bonds that are just good and healthy.” So I think doing that allows you to go into work to say, “Look, I just got to play for four hours. Now, I can go in and do my work for four hours and I feel much better about it. And I feel like I can actually do things that are creative and I’m not going in drained and just kind of unsure of what’s happening.”

Kyle:

I love that. What are some of the ways that you want to play? What are some of these things that you want to bring into your work right now? What are you discovering for that?

Anni:

I think just reading, not just for work, but just taking time to sit and read, just allow myself to relax. I play the piano. Just being outside in the fresh air, doing things that … Going out to coffee with friends, just meeting people that I love, I have a great relationship. Those are the things that allow me to kind of decompress and take my mind off of work and then I can go into work saying, “I thought of a new idea,” or, “I did something that was really powerful and now I can kind of integrate that into my work.” And it comes from a really genuine and fresh place.

Kyle:

I Love that. Well, Anni, it’s been so much fun chatting and exploring a lot of these topics with you. If anybody who’s listening is really loving what they’re hearing right now, where can they go to learn more about you? Tell us about your book. You’ve been very modest, not even telling us the name of your book, or anything like that. So please share that. And who would be the person that would really be well served to reach out to you?

Anni:

Yeah. Anyone who is looking really to become a person that does things that matter, whether you own your own business or not, no matter what industry you’re in, if you want to grow your passion, if you want to grow your purpose and your mission, you want to have a why behind what you do. This book is definitely for you. So it’s called Leadership Built On Why. And it’ll really help kind of break down those old leadership models. And it’s really going to simply walk you through, this is how you discover your mission. This is how you discover your purpose. This is how you create it into your ‘why’. And then this is what you can do with it. So it’s available on Amazon. The website is www.annikeffer.com, A-N-N-I K-E-F-F-E-R. Got some great resources up there and get a free chapter of the book and then you can also order it on Amazon.

Kyle:

Well, thank you so much for joining us and yeah, hopefully, we’ll have you on the show again soon after hearing you on more stages and seeing you impact the world more. Thanks so much for joining us, Anni.

Anni:

Thanks for having me, Kyle. Appreciate it.

Kyle:

Thanks for listening to The Story Engine podcast. Be sure to check out the show notes and resources mentioned in this episode and every episode at thestoryengine.co. If you want to tell better stories and grow your business with content marketing and copywriting, be sure to download the content strategy template at contentstrategytemplate.com. This template is an essential part of any business that wants to boost their traffic, leads, and sales with content marketing. Thanks for listening and we’ll see you next time.

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