SEP Episode 10: How To Turn Your Passion Into Profit

Today on the show we have Jimmy Moore. Jimmy Moore is a very early adopter and one of the titans of content marketing in the health and wellness space. He runs Living La Vida Low-Carb, which is a blog about a low carb diet that saved and changed his life. He’s got so many stories about how to grow a brand authentically, and through a very service-oriented mindset, which is one of the reasons why he’s been able to grow this brand so steadily for so long and create a huge, huge presence around it. He’s got so many very, very good lessons to share with you today.

PODCAST

Key Takeaways

[3:01] Picking a brand name

[6:19] How full transparency gains you relatability

[7:49] Transitioning from blog to business

[14:32] How to connect to your audience

[17:56] Utilizing all the different social media platforms to the utmost

[20:08] Dealing with haters

[24:42] Impacting your online content marketing through offline events

[28:09] The do’s and don’ts of building strong collaborative relationships

[33:15] The importance and rewards of giving back

 

Jimmy Moore Information

Livinlavidalowcarb.com

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

LinkedIn

The Livin Low Carb Show

Fasting Talk with Jimmy and Friends

Keto Talk with Jimmy Moore and Dr. Will Cole

Livin La Vida Low Carb

21 Life Lessons Livin La Vida Low Carb

Keto Clarity

More Books by Jimmy Moore

Low Carb Cruise

 

Transcript of Podcast

Kyle Gray:                            

Welcome to the Story Engine podcast where we teach you how to make marketing easier, more powerful, and fun through storytelling. I’m your host, Kyle Gray. Each week we learn from top entrepreneurs, influencers, and world changers on how to share your story through content, copyrighting, and speaking, and how to make your message your most powerful marketing tool.

Today on the show we have Jimmy Moore, and I’m excited to have him on the show. It’s a big honor. So, without any further ado over to Jimmy. Jimmy, I would love for you to tell us about your origin story, why you started Living La Vida Low-Carb, and how this became the amazing blog and brand that it is today.

Jimmy Moore:                  

What’s interesting is I never sought out to start a brand. That was not even on my radar screen. I’d done a little bit of marketing in my history in the retail realm, and I’d done a little bit of radio, so I understood the whole marketing aspect of things. But I never started my “brand.” It wasn’t that when I started. It was just an outlet for me when I first started. I had just lost 180 pounds doing the Atkins diet, and a lot of people were saying, “Well, hey, where’s your website?” This was a long time ago. This was like 2005  when I lost the weight. And so people, like, “Where’s your website? Where’s your blog?” And I’m like, “Will you people leave me alone? This is my life.” But they were like, “Oh, we want to learn more. We want to hear from you.”

I’m like, “Okay.” So, a buddy of mine at the time had a political blog and he’s like, “Dude, you got to start a blog.” This was 2006, 2005, that area, and nobody was really into it in the health realm, which was what I was going to try to get into. I was like, “I don’t know how to do that. I mean, I like to write, but that’s about it.” And the guy’s like, “Just start it, dude.” So I did. I started a Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb as my brand. And yes, Ricky Martin was relevant at the time. No, he’s not anymore, but at the time I thought, “Well, let’s just grab their attention with something fun. Funny. That’s my personality.” So, we threw Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb out there as a blog in April of 2005.                      

People started flocking to it because it was kind of fresh. It was new. Dr. Atkins had died a couple of years before, and so people were hungry for learning about the low carb ketogenic diet. I kind of filled that void, and this is a lesson for anyone starting a brand. Try to fill the voids where other people are either underserving that void, or it’s just completely void and nobody’s doing anything. I think that just struck gold in as much as the chosen diet that I went on just happened to have this huge void in the market for a voice like mine. Of course, I never came at it from the position of I know more than you and I’m the expert. I have never pretended to be the guru. I’ve always been the average everyday Joe Schmo, and in this case Jimmy Moore, that’s just kind of living this and sharing the experiences, good, bad and ugly, and it’s served me quite well as I progressed on this building of my brand, which I do actively now build the brand.

Kyle Gray:                            

Jimmy, I think what’s so inspiring about this is that, yeah, you just started this because people were demanding it. People were asking. You didn’t have any, no business aspirations. You weren’t trying to create something in the beginning, but you were just trying to serve people, or maybe you weren’t even trying to do that, but people were just begging for it.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Well, and quite frankly, I needed an outlet because I had this major event happen in my life. I lost 180 pounds and completely, radically changed my life, so I needed an outlet to scream it from the mountaintops. Even if nobody was listening, I needed somewhere where I could take the creative energy, the talents, the skills that I had, which writing has always been on that radar screen. I love to write. And so, it gave me an outlet.

Kyle Gray:                            

I think that’s amazing. What I also really enjoy is, you didn’t approach this as an expert, as you said. You’re being transparent and you’re just kind of sharing your personal experience, warts and all, and I’m wondering-

Jimmy Moore:                  

Still . . .

Kyle Gray:                            

… how has being transparent, and sharing your progress, and maybe even telling stories that you don’t quite know how they’re going to end. A lot of people, when they approach content, or they create things, they have a story with a beginning, a middle and an end, and they know how to process it all together. You were actively experimenting. You’re actively learning. How do you think that sharing that, and being transparent online has impacted your own story? I imagine that it actually keeps you accountable to what you’re doing these days.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Oh my gosh, yes.

In a word, I would say relatable, because there are so many people, they don’t have the platform that I have. They don’t have the voice that I have, going out over the airwaves and talking about this stuff on a daily basis, and yet they themselves are living their lives. Going through the day to day struggles. Going through the things in their life that they’re like, “Okay, I must be the only one dealing with this.” So then along comes a Jimmy Moore that they see going through daily life and publicly talking about some of the things that they’re dealing with. So, it’s that relatability factor that I think has given me my longevity.

Kyle Gray:                            

I think that that’s one of the key aspects of storytelling. That’s why people relate to stories, and that’s why they are so powerful because it allows us to kind of experience a day in your life, or a walk in your shoes. Yeah, I agree that many of us go through many experiences feeling like we’re the only ones, or we don’t feel safe to share it, and so I really applaud that courage. I’d like to ask you now kind of how in the early stages of transitioning, just from kind of you documenting what was going on to maybe the early stages of creating a business, which I imagine would be kind of right around your first book.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Oh no. It was long before then, but yeah. But we can.

Kyle Gray:                            

Yeah, yeah. Transition me into, you’re like, Hey, there might be a little bit more than just a kind of blog on the side here. How do I build a business around that?

Jimmy Moore:                  

You know what was funny was I was approached by this sugar-free chocolate bar company, and they said, “Hey, I love what you’re doing with your blog. Can I advertise?” It was the first time it was on my radar screen that somebody wanted to actually make money off of my platform, and I’m going, “Whoa.” I didn’t know how to respond. I looked at my wife, Christine, and I said, “Somebody wants to give me some money to throw a banner ad up on my blog.” She’s like, “Well go for it.” I was like, “I don’t know how to do this. I don’t know what to charge.” So, I  threw a number out at her, because she wanted to do it for a year, and said, “What would you charge for a year?” I didn’t know how to price it at all.

So I said, “I don’t know. $200?” Within minutes she came back, “Yeah. Okay. No problem.” So she sent out the check and I was like, “Okay, that was too easy. What’s the catch here? What’s going on?” Then a year later she comes back and says, “Hey, I want to renew. That was amazing. I want to renew.” And she’s like, “But you can charge me a little more than you did that last year.” I was like, “Okay, I’m getting a clue. I have a pretty good following now.” I looked at my wife again and I said, “I’m putting a zero behind that number.” My wife said, “There’s no way she’s going to do 10 times that amount.? I asked for $2,000, and she said yes right away again. I went, “Crap. I should ask for more.”                                            

It’s been that whole tinkering, and testing, and figuring out what the market will bear. I’ve gotten a little savvier at it now that I’ve done this a very long time. I’m constantly looking, and evaluating, and analyzing, even with my podcasts now, which I monetize through advertising in the same way. I’ve had to increase my rates because I have so many people banging on my door.

Kyle Gray:                            

I think that’s powerful. How did you bring in more different forms of content? Again, you have several books now. You have a podcast that’s very, very successful in over, I think you’re about at 1200 episodes.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Over 1400, yes.

Kyle Gray:                            

1400 episodes.

Jimmy Moore:                  

My flagship episode is Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb show, but Keto Talk is also very popular. KetoHacking MD podcast. All of these are in the top 50 of fitness and nutrition podcasts.

Kyle Gray:                            

That is so powerful. How did you start transitioning from being just a writer to having all of these different mediums? Do you have a team to support you in creating all this content?

Jimmy Moore:                  

This is always the funny thing. When people write me emails, “To the person that answers the emails for Jimmy Moore.” I said, “His name is Jimmy Moore.” For a long time, it was me. I’ve started to hire some people to help me, but in those early days,  I started increasing in the people writing to me and asking questions, and yeah, about a year after I started my blog, which was 2005 when I started the blog, so about 2006, this guy writes me an email and he says, “Hey, if you talk half as good as you write, you should be podcasting.” And again, 2006, 12 years ago, not that long ago, it was pre-iPhone. So yeah, nobody was doing podcasting at the time, before the iPhone came out and made it very easy for everybody to listen, on Stitcher or wherever you listen.                                     

He said, “Hey, you should be a podcaster.” And I’m like, “What the heck is a podcast?” I’d just started this new thing called a blog. “What do you mean podcasts?” And said, “Oh, I’ll help you out. I’ll be your producer.” He’s still my producer today by the way. He’s produced every single thing I’ve ever done. We started the Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb in October of 2006, and it’s now the longest-running health podcast on the internet. Again, no Ph.D., no MD, no RD, no any D after my name. I’m just a dude. I got passionate about a subject, decided to create content, and from the content, I got ear balls, and from the earballs and eyeballs that read my blog and read my books, I have a market that now I can sell advertisers on and say, “Hey, you want that market? I got them. Come on.”

Kyle Gray:                            

Oh, that’s a beautiful thing. And again, really inspiring, how humble you are, and how organic all of this is. I think, again, it goes to show to our listeners out there that really kind of tapping into a need, and listening to your audience, and really finding a way to communicate with your listeners is one of the best ways that you can grow something that’s really solid. It’s not just attempting to cut straight to the huge launches, or the kind of tech crunch headlines or anything like that. It’s really just tuning in to your audience. What are some of the ways that you connect with and communicate with your audience? Maybe starting from the early days, and maybe it’s different now?

Jimmy Moore:                  

It’s way different now because of the technology. Let me say one thing before I get to that. If you’re getting into the online world to “make money” please go away. We hate you.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Make money, please go away. We hate you in the online content providing section of the world because you’re the reason why people get turned off. Because you’re only in it for the money. What you’ve heard me say a lot today already is content, content, content. How much does it cost people to get that content? Absolutely zero. Now if you want to buy my books, yes, that costs money. If you want to support any of my advertisers, yes, that costs money. But you get access to literally all the things that I do, all the videos, all the podcasts, all the blogs, everything that I do online is pretty much free to the consumer. Now if you find value in it, the hope is that someone would buy your books and support your sponsors, which they do. But don’t get in it for the money. The money should not be your major motivation. It’s a nice side effect that comes from that passion that burns within you. So, sorry, I had to get that out in the open.

[bctt tweet=”If you are only creating content for the money, people will instantly be turned off. -Jimmy Moore” username=”kylethegray”]

Kyle Gray:                            

I think that’s a very important place because not only does it turn people off. People, especially these days, are very, very savvy and can smell just somebody being greedy from miles and miles away. But yeah, connecting with that deeper purpose and making it more about making money. It’s about making an impact on the world.

Jimmy Moore:                  

So to your question though, regarding the progression of the content. So yes, it started off as a blog and how I connected with my audience. So it started off as a blog and of course, there’s comment section blog and I would interact with people there. At the time, there wasn’t any social media when I first started blogging. There was no Facebook. I think MySpace was kinda there but I didn’t really ever engage there. Forums were the thing of the day back in the day. And so I did that. And then along came Facebook and got on there and everybody went haywire interacting with each other and so that was cool.

And then, of course, some of the other formats came along. I avoided Twitter for the longest time and Instagram because I’m like I’m not a recipe blogger. A lot of those things, especially Instagram and Pinterest and those kinds of ones were for people that had pretty food pictures in my world. And so I was like, “Well, I do like to eat and I do like to make food, but I don’t like to necessarily post recipes and all that kind of thing,” so I made a mistake. I did not get on those platforms soon enough. Now I’m on there now and I’ve definitely built a decent following on both platforms, but I wish I had gotten on there sooner because don’t neglect that there are certain people that will only follow you on Twitter, for example. I’ve done podcasts, and blogs, and all kinds of things online for years and there are people that only follow what I post on twitter.

Now that blows my mind because you would think if you get fandom of someone, you would want to kind of follow them wherever they are, but I have people that are only following me on Twitter and same with Instagram. They only follow what I do on Instagram. So I have to engage with them where they are. And that’s a lesson in and of itself too. If you’re building a brand, you have to be where the people are. And you might think, “Okay, I’ve got a Facebook page, I’ve got a website, that’s good enough.” Nah-uh. Not in today’s age. You literally have to be in every single spot where there are eyeballs. And I’m sure there are places … I mean I’ve dibble-dabbled in Snapchat and I’m like, “Okay, I just got lost.” I was like what?

But a lot of the major ones, I’m all over them and I’ve now gravitated … Mostly Instagram’s kind of the new hit of the day. They added in IGTV recently. And they’ve got some really cool interactions. They added the question feature. So I use those things to really talk directly to my followers. And people love that. And especially with the medium that I’ve used for many years which is the voice through podcasting, people have been used to hearing my voice and now they get to see on video, on Instagram, doing an Instagram live or an Instastory, it’s just you keep changing with the times. Because it’d be very easy to fall back on what you did even three or four years ago. You’re in ancient history three or four years ago. You have to constantly shift with the changing technology.

Kyle Gray:                            

And how do you manage all of your different strategies on these different platforms? The way that people engage with you on Twitter I’m sure is very different than how you’re doing it on Instagram. And so do you just … Are you just kind of experimenting and feeling things out? It’s probably easier with kind of a good brand like yours to build up early followings, but how do you balance things and how do you experiment with all of these new tools?

Jimmy Moore:                  

So I think you just do them. I think people try to over complicate this, Kyle. They think, “Okay, I’m not an expert on doing videos on Instagram so therefore I can’t be on Instagram.” Uh-uh. Get on there. Mess up. Look stupid a few times. We all have. I think people are afraid of what they don’t know. And I’m like, “That’s not an excuse,” just keep tinkering, keep testing. And if you’re engaging enough, if people like watching and listening to you, and you give them content that adds value to their life, they’ll stick with you. And so that’s something I’ve always held true to is I will never try to be some personality online that I’m not in real life. I mean, people just don’t like that. They want to see a real human being, being themselves and that’s what you always get with Jimmy Moore.

Kyle Gray:                            

That’s a beautiful thing. And I love that. Yeah, you’ve gotta … People really need to face their fears when it comes to creating and just put themselves out there. And I actually think the process of building a brand like you have and telling your story, and being vulnerable like this forces us often to kind of reflect on ourselves. And I’m wondering if there were specific moments in this journey for you where you had to come up against some kind of your own internal fears or your own internal limitations, or maybe there is a post or piece of content that you wanted to share that you were like, “Oh, man. I’m really scared to share this, but let’s see what happens.” And how did that go?

Jimmy Moore:                  

You’re talking to a guy that doesn’t fear anything.

Kyle Gray:                            

Beautiful.

Jimmy Moore:                  

I’ve ever done that because, at the end of the day, the only person I have to answer to is myself. Now that doesn’t mean there isn’t doubt that comes in every once in a while. Especially when you’re in a touchy subject like weight loss and health and you put on a few pounds, there is that kind of insecurity that comes from what will people think of me and will they think less of me. And of course, then the inevitable, which is the elephant in the room we haven’t talked about, about being online regardless of the industry you’re in, you’re gonna get haters.

And so how do you deal with that, and how does that impact you, and does it impact your content as a result? And as someone who’s been online now for umpteen years, you have to just learn to shut that noise out and just be you. And it’s something I wish somebody had been around when I first started that told me that. Just be you. Just don’t let anything deter you from your purpose, and your purpose, and your passion that drives you to do what you do and to share what you share. You can’t let anybody knock you off the bat. If you do, then that’s on you. You’ve gotta figure out how to handle that because it’s inevitable. The haters are gonna hate. But you don’t have to listen to them.

[bctt tweet=”Don’t let anything deter you from your purpose and the passion that drives you; haters are gonna’ hate, but you don’t have to listen to them. -Jimmy Moore ” username=”kylethegray”]

Kyle Gray:                            

Oh, I think that’s a beautiful, beautiful lesson to learn. And yeah, something that I think at least most of us can use a little bit of a reminder from here and there. I’d like to talk to you now more about … When I was reaching out to you over these last couple of weeks and months, you mentioned you were at a conference. And I imagine now with your experience in this world speaking to a lot of people, making a lot of connections through content, you are also speaking offline and seen as an authority at many different health and wellness conferences. And I would like to know if you do any speaking and how your interactions in the offline world impact your online presence.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Oh, I love this question. Thank you for that. So I gotta tell a story about the first time I ever spoke and was invited to speak at a quote conference. And I say quote conference because I was just doing my … I do an annual event that’s a low carb cruise every May. And so we had a couple of people from Australia come on that in 2012. And at the end of it, they wrote me and they said, “Hey, mate. We want to have a conference here that’s a land event, that’s low carb oriented, and we were thinking of doing a conference.” So I thought, because of my connections in the community, they wanted me to connect them to some big name in the community. Now, this was 2012 before I even had my major publisher books at the time. And they’re like, “We want you, mate.” And I was like, “What?”

And it was the first time that I was like okay, somebody sees value in what I’m contributing even though, again, I’ve never pretended to be an expert. I do have something to say. And so they invite me to come to speak. I actually had to buy PowerPoint for the first time in my life and figure out how to use it. And I put together this presentation. And at the end of it, my very first presentation, in Melbourne, Australia. In November of 2012. And I’ll never forget it because it was pretty cool that I’m asking the people in the audience questions about you listen to my podcast, and three-fourths of them raised their hand in Australia. And so it just kinda made it humbling for me that wow. This thing is bigger than even I thought it was. Which made it a little scary at the moment. But at the same time, I felt exhilarated.

I mean, as I was telling jokes … As you can tell, I like to be a little funny sometimes. So in my presentation, people were laughing. And I’m like, “Whoa, I never get feedback on my podcast,” because I’m sitting here in my studio right now and I don’t usually hear feedback. But in a live setting, you get the feedback. So yeah, so then that got me the bug. I did a whole tour across Australia. Got home and I was like, “Hey, who else can I go speak to?” And now I’m regularly invited to speak at various conferences. And I actually have gotten to the point now that I’m invited to speak so much that I have to turn people down, which is really weird to me because just five years ago, six years ago, I wasn’t doing this at all. And now I’m turning down people.

Kyle Gray:                            

That is amazing. And you mentioned you do a low carb cruise, do you have any other kind of high ticket events or products that you offer people that maybe speaking helps drive or does speaking at these big conferences help grow your podcast more and support that?

Jimmy Moore:                  

Yes. And you mentioned that as well, how do you engage differently at these conferences and then how does it impact the way you do your regular content. Thank you, by the way. Because I make it a point … And this is a lesson for anybody that gets involved in some industry, regardless of what industry, and you’re connecting with an audience. You need that audience, when they meet you in person, to not think you’re the biggest jerk in the world. Can I tell you how many people I have looked up to online and then I meet them in person and I’m like, “You little bleep.” Because they’re not that way in person. And you go, “Man, it’s all an act.” If you meet me at a conference, I guarantee you, you’re gonna feel like you already have a friend. And I’m gonna come and hug your neck and I’m gonna engage in conversation with you because it’s about real relationships with me. And you can always tell who truly is in this for the right reasons because they’re doing those things. They’re not hiding.

The thing that really gets me the most about these conferences is when some prima donna speaker talks, and everybody’s at their talk, and they’re a big name, and then as soon as their talk is over, they go hide. They don’t even go and speak to people. Even people that just want to say, “Thank you for your work, thank you for what you do, thank you for your book,” blah, blah, they don’t even stick around to hear those kinds of things. And to me, that’s sad. It’s like if you want to put yourself out there and you want the engagement from an audience-

Jimmy Moore:                  

…then you’ve got to give back to them. I make it a deliberate effort to give back. Even as I’ve become very successful at selling books and all that, and been financially better off because of that, I give back even more. I have this whole sense of gratefulness about what I get to do because again, I’m just the dude that just happened to find the diet that worked for me, that helped me lose weight. Then I got passionate, and I’m finding every way that I can possibly find today to get the word out about it, and people love that.

Kyle Gray:                            

I think that’s so inspiring how you’ve managed to maintain your humanity and your humility all through this process.

Jimmy Moore:                  

I told my wife, “Please slap me if I ever get that prima donnaness. She promised to do that.

Kyle Gray:                            

That’s a good check. She’ll be the first to know.

Jimmy Moore:                  

She does, she keeps me so humble sometimes. All right, honey. You’re not all that.

Kyle Gray:                            

On your way through this content journey, through the speaking, through this podcast right now you are booked through the end of the year with podcast guests. Everybody wants to get on your show.

Jimmy Moore:                  

I have a waiting list of 600 people, yes.

Kyle Gray:                            

Outstanding. What I want to know is in my journey I found that some of the best ways to really get success in content, to grow your business quickly is not just through search engine optimization, or paid ads, or anything like that. It’s about what you said. It’s about building real relationships. When people reach out to you, and want to connect with you, and collaborate with you, can you give us some good examples of some amazing ways people have done that that you’re like, “Yes, I would love to work with this person,” and then maybe some no’s about how people have reached out to you that you don’t even respond or it’s just like, yeah.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Let me start with the latter one because I see those people a mile away. If they’re already high maintenance in their first email to you in terms of they’ve written you a book, I’m sorry. Thank you for your time, but I’m going to move on with my life because if they’re already that way on your very first introduction, how are they going to be once they get going with you on a project? For me, I’m like I don’t need that stress in my life. That’s my own Jimmy More, as I call it, that I’ve learned to see that kind of thing. Plus, I do my research on the people I work with.                                          

What gets me too is, I have a huge following on Facebook. I go look it up, and they have 2,000 followers. I’m like, “That’s not quite huge, but keep working on it. Keep building. That’s not huge.” I think getting people to get the right perception of what big is if they want to collaborate I need you to truly be a collaborator. Plus, I want to see if they’re wanting to collaborate on a book, for example, can you write? I’ve actually run into this with a coauthor, a couple coauthors now. One is a medical doctor that I was going to write a book with.                    

He had this great idea. I told him, “Okay. I’ve got an established name in health books. Let’s collaborate.” He gets going, and I start doing my thing with it. In the middle of it, he’s like, “I want to change directions,” so then he changes direction. I start doing my thing with the new direction. I want to change direction. It was totally of what the original idea was. Of course, I write bunches of books. I have five more in the next 18 months coming, so I’m busy with books. I’m striking while the iron is hot, by the way, because keto is huge right now.

This guy, I finally went to him, and I said, “I can’t keep being strung along. I feel that woman that stays with the guy because you always dated him.” We’re not doing that anymore, sorry. You’re out of my life. I went to the publisher, and of course, they were totally cool. They’re like, “Yeah, you’ve got a lot of other projects you got to get to.” I lost a whole year of writing books because of this guy. I learned a lesson from that. Know who and what your coauthors about.

Another coauthor came to me and wanted to do a book. They were writing the first draft, and they’re writing was horrible, just really, really bad, and I had no idea. The publisher was like, “We can’t really do anything with this. It needs to be cleaned up.” I’ve had to put that project on hold until some of my other projects that I’m more passionate about that aren’t dealing with those challenges is done. Yeah, it’s not all rosy when you make decisions, but sifting through who the good people are from the bad people is a fine art, and it’s not perfect.

I think if you’re going to hear from people like that, you be the one that initiates the contact with who you want to collaborate with. My most famous book was Keto Clarity. Cholesterol Clarity came before that one, and I knew a medical doctor I wanted to collaborate with. I drive three hours up the road to see him, and I’d known him from conferences, Dr. Eric Westman, and known him for many years, been to conferences together. I said, “Hey, Eric. Let’s write some books together. You interested?” He’s like, “I’ve been looking to do something like this. I can’t really do a lot of the writing.” I said, “Don’t worry about that. I’ll do a lot of the writing.” You just make sure that the science is right that I’m writing, and he did and made various contributions that I was very grateful for. Now Keto Clarity, it’s sold over 1/4 million copies worldwide, translated into eight different languages. It’s pretty darn cool.

Kyle Gray:                            

That is amazing and really good lessons for people who want to start engaging and want to start connecting with influencers like yourself. I think that’s again, powerful insights, and again a humbling perspective for people coming up. You’re willing to make these big moves to make a connection and how well it paid off.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Can I say one more thing?

Kyle Gray:                            

Absolutely.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Something I’ve done since I’ve been successful is I am a pay it forward kind of guy because I have been very blessed in my life to be able to do what I do. One of the things that I make a very conscious effort about now all these years later after the success, I was an overnight success, it only took 10 years to happen. I started this, not with the intention of ever making any money, or making it a business, or making it a brand even though Livin’ La Vida Low Carbs has become a very strong brand. Keto Clarity has become a very strong brand. I’ve got various brands that are out there, but what I do now, and I don’t charge for this. I probably should, but I don’t because I have such a passion for getting people to be as successful as I have. I mentor people all the time.                                         

If you’ve been even a modicum of success, and you’re not mentoring other people about doing what you just did, you’re a jerk. Sorry, you really are. You’ve got to pay it forward because you weren’t the only one that made that brand pop. You had a lot of help along the way, so be that help to other people. There are varieties of people in my realm because Keto has come on really strong as a diet trend in our culture. There are all these new people coming out, and I get people writing to me saying, “Hey, how did you do that? Let’s collaborate.” I always help them come up with how to brand themselves, how to market themselves. There’s this teenage girl that just started her own YouTube channel because I urged her. Hey, what are you good at? I love doing videos. Okay, you need to be the Keto teen who puts out videos. Now Britney is doing that. You be that encourager to other people.

[bctt tweet=”You’ve got to pay it forward because you weren’t the only one that made your brand pop -Jimmy Moore” username=”kylethegray”]

Here’s the cool thing too. When you do that, their success then becomes your success too. They will never forget you for that. That connection that you make with someone in that realm, and I’ve done the same with books, by the way. I’ve helped people get signed to my publisher. I’ve become an agent as far as here’s a really good person that’s an up-and-comer. You need to give them a book. Then it becomes an international bestseller. It’s like, you have to give back. If you hoard it all for yourself, it will all be taken away from you. I truly believe that. Again, I think that’s a little bit of the secret of my success is I’m willing to give as much as I take.

Kyle Gray:                            

Wow. What an inspirational thing to share and truth that sits really deeply with me. I really appreciate you sharing that. I think that that is an excellent way to put a cap on this interview. Jimmy, thank you so much for your time. It’s been very inspirational, very entertaining, and very educational for me and I’m sure for everybody listening. You’ve shared a lot of your brands now, but I definitely want to say, where can people go if they want to connect with you and want to learn a little bit more about you?

Jimmy Moore:                  

By the way, thank you for letting me come on your show because I’m usually talking about ketogenic diets, fasting, cholesterol, weight loss, all this. I actually got to talk about business stuff. That’s fun for me. I dibble-dabbled in starting a business podcast, but I have no time for that right now.

Kyle Gray:                            

I’ve got you covered on that one.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Yes, you do. You’re doing a great job, Kyle. I’m easy to find. Again, I didn’t do any SEO optimization, and key word, and all this kind of stuff. I just made my brand. I just gave good content, and it all happened pretty spontaneously. If you Google Jimmy Moore, like the first two or three pages is literally all my stuff. I do four podcasts a week. I’ve got seven books out there with five more in the next year and a half on the way. I do all kinds of projects. Definitely, just Google my name. You’ll find it, or you can go to LivinLaVidaLowCarb.com.

Kyle Gray:                            

Thank you so much for joining us, Jimmy. It’s been a total honor. Hopefully, we’ll talk to you again on the show soon.

Jimmy Moore:                  

Thank you.

Kyle Gray:                            

Thanks for listening to the Story Engine podcast. Be sure to check out the show notes and resources mentioned in this episode and every episode at the StoryEngine.co. If you want to tell better stories and grow your business with content marketing and copywriting, be sure to download the content strategy template at contentstrategytemplate.com. This template is an essential part of any business that wants to boost their traffic, leads, and sales with content marketing. Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time.

 

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