SEP Episode 35: Pat Quinn’s Secrets to Becoming a Better Speaker

 

Today on the show my guest is Pat Quinn. Pat is one of the best speaking coaches I’ve had the honor of meeting and the more recent honor of actually being able to work with. In this interview, Pat mentions a few times a set of workshops that he teaches that is known as the Advance Your Reach Signature Talk Execution Workshops, and I have had the pleasure of attending these workshops and using them to develop a talk. This is a talk I’ve used on stages, off stages, on webinars, in many different places and it is totally shifted what I do in my business. 

 

Podcast

 

Key Takeaways

[2:48] How great storytelling can leave a lasting impression

[7:00] Structuring your presentation for high engagement

[9:32] The biggest mistake speakers make

[10:06] What a compression statement is and how to use it effectively

[13:16] How an audience member’s brain works during a presentation

[16:20] The #1 technique Pat uses to significantly increase audience engagement

[21:38] Tips on speaking to a live audience vs. an online audience

[27:33] How to use contrast in voice and movement

[30:27] The type of speaker that will get the sale at the end of the day

 

Bonus Content: Powerful Speaking Techniques From Three World-Class Talks

Powerful Speaking Techniques From Three World-Class Talks

 

Links and Resources Mentioned in this Episode

Advance Your Reach

Advance Your Reach Services

Advance Your Reach Blog

Facebook

Twitter

Nicholas Kusmich

 

Transcript

Kyle Gray:

Recently I started working with Pat as a facilitator in these story execution workshops. So each month I get to travel out to Milwaukee and teach with him and see how he works with many different speakers of many different experience levels, many different industries, and brings out the best in their stories.

Kyle Gray:

I want to include a little bonus treat in the show notes. I did a couple of interviews with him last year where he is reviewing some of his favorite talks and speaking over them about the different techniques that they’re using and what he really likes about them. So if you want to see Pat in action examining some of the best talks and what he loves about them, make sure to check out the show notes for this episode at thestoryengine.co. But there are plenty of amazing tips and strategies that he shares right on this interview that I think are going to blow your mind and change the way that you present. Whether you’re presenting on stages, on webinars, on podcasts, wherever you’re sharing your knowledge, this is going to be a huge impact for you. So let’s give it over to Pat. Pat, thank you so much for joining us.

Pat Quinn:

Hey, thanks, Kyle. It’s a pleasure to be here.

Kyle Gray:

So as a master storyteller, I’m really excited to ask you this question, which is what I start most of these episodes with. But tell me about a moment in your life that really shaped you and defined you to become who you are today and do what you’re doing today.

Pat Quinn:

Well, I think everybody has those moments when they hear a great speaker, that you kind of get, you remember the moment forever. You remember where you were sitting. You remember who you were with. And there’s a moment in my life, from about 20 years ago, when I heard a master storyteller named Bill Hybels tell a story from the stage in front of about 5,000 people. I felt like I was the only one in the room. The moment left such an impression on me telling a simple story about being in the airport in Johannesburg, South Africa and seeing two kids that were kind of hitting each other and wrestling with each other and just being mean to each other. And he talked about how the things we were doing today could change the world and change the next generation. And I felt he was speaking right to me.

Pat Quinn:

But here’s the thing, the other 5,000 people in the room felt the exact same thing. It left such an indelible impression in my life that 15 years later when my kids were old enough to understand that what a moment like that could mean to somebody, we actually took them back. It’s about two and a half hours from our house, the auditorium that we’re in. We took them back and showed them the spot that I was sitting and that my wife and I were sitting when this moment happened. And great storytellers can do that. Great storytellers can take you back to a place, that you’ll always remember the first time you heard this story or this person speak. And I’ll never forget that day.

Kyle Gray:

That is really excellent and a great starting point for this, because I’ve heard it said before, that the things that you really admire are reflections of qualities within yourself. And I think that that’s absolutely true with that story. After having seen you speak on stage several times in front of many different audiences and seeing the effect you have on people, you absolutely create that same effect. And that is one of the reasons why I wanted to invite you onto the show. I’ve seen you present in multiple different formats, online, offline, big stages, small groups, and your teaching style is so natural and authentic and powerful and creates that experience whether you’re, again, in a room reaching out to hundreds of people or teaching a small group of eight. And I would love to hear today some of the basic but really powerful ways that we could, anybody could present better, whether they’re speaking on a Webinar or a podcast or on a stage. And yeah, do you have a couple of basic places that we can start off with them?

Pat Quinn:

Well, I actually didn’t get my start as a professional speaker. I got my start as a professional magician and for 10 years I worked magic professionally. Then I became a high school math teacher and taught high school math for 12 years. And during that time I picked up an advanced degree in how adults learn. So I really bring two things to the table when it comes to storytelling. The first is a little bit of stagecraft and how to direct the audience’s attention to what you want them to be paying attention to. And the second is a real understanding of how adults learn. How they hear stories, how they remember stories, which is why when we’re working with people we often point out that you’re including too many details and they aren’t going to remember any of those. Remember when you listen to a story, you really just remembering the purpose of the story or the gist of the story as we say.

Pat Quinn:

So people will include details sometimes because they think it makes it seem more realistic sometimes because they don’t know any better. Sometimes those details are distracting and sometimes those details will actually stop people from learning the lesson from the story that you want them to learn. So my first piece of advice for everybody who’s telling a story, whether it’s your story, a teaching story, someone else’s story, is to ask yourself, “What’s the purpose of telling this story?” We help a lot of people with their signature presentations. A presentation that might be 30 or 45 minutes long that you might give from a stage or in a webinar or on a podcast. Different parts of that presentation have different purposes.

Pat Quinn:

Stories in the opening third of most presentations are designed to teach the audience about the speaker. And so when you first start hearing someone speak, the stories that they’re telling shouldn’t be teaching content and shouldn’t be teaching how you want to leave them. They should be teaching about you because the first thing in the audience has to do is learn about the person who’s telling the story. And so in that opening third of your presentation, we want all of your stories to be about you.

Pat Quinn:

In the middle part of your presentation, we tell stories that teach our content. Teach about our business. Teach what we do, and teach what we want the audience to learn.

Pat Quinn:

And then at the end of the presentation, we want to choose a specific emotion and tell a story or two that will lead the audience into that specific emotion. That might be a take action or be inspired or buy now, depending upon the type of the presentation. But it is intentionally chosen so that the stories that we tell lead to that action. And so a lot of times people who we work with are telling the right stories. They’re just telling them at the wrong time. They open with a story that teaches content, which isn’t what you should do. Or they have in the middle of their presentation, their most emotional story, which isn’t what you should do.

Pat Quinn:

The first question I would ask anybody who’s going to start to tell a story is, “What is the purpose of that story?” To teach to the audience about you? To teach the audience your content, or get the audience to experience a specific emotion?

Kyle Gray:

I think that’s really powerful. And a lot of the people that I’ve met and I’ve worked with, they’re very smart and they’re very intelligent and they always lean on trying to teach as much as possible and share as much information as they can. They feel that’s the way that if they show all of their knowledge, then people will connect with them but I think it’s a really powerful framework to be able to hone in on what is the least amount I can teach them so that I don’t overwhelm them, but I show them the value I can create?

Pat Quinn:

Yeah. Most of the work that we do with the speakers that we work with, and I’ve been fortunate enough over the last 10 years to work with six different Olympians, two different astronauts, a number of New York Times bestselling author, a number of pastors that you see on television every Sunday. But most of the people I work with are not professional speakers. Most of the people I work with are small business owners who want to grow their businesses and attract new clients through speaking. And the mistake that they make is they believe the person who teaches the most gets the sale and that’s actually not true. The person who teaches the most rarely gets the sale because they’ve overwhelmed the audience with just a glut of information and that’s not actually what people are attracted to.

Pat Quinn:

What people are attracted to are people who have already read all the information and have picked the most important stuff. They love the cliff notes, which is why early in presentations we often want to include something called a compression statement. A compression statement is to say, “I’ve been doing this for 20 years and I’m going to take that 20 years of knowledge and teach it to you the very best stuff from it in 45 minutes.” Basically, what you’re saying and I’d love you to actually use the words, “I’ve made a lot of painful and costly mistakes.” If you’re giving your story if you’re giving a presentation to attract clients, to tell the clients that you’ve made a lot of painful and costly mistakes in the last 10 years, and then the next 30 minutes, you’re going to show them how to avoid those painful and costly mistakes. Well, there you have your return on investment right there. “Why would I pay you $1,000 for this or 2,000 or $10,000 for this?” “Well, I’ll tell you why because I’ll help you avoid those painful and costly mistakes.”

Pat Quinn:

So the compression statement is to say, “I’ve been doing this for 12 years and in the next 30 minutes, I’m going to teach you everything that I’ve learned in those 12 years. The most important things that I’ve learned. The things I’ve learned that will help you the most.” That’s a compression statement. It’s basically saying, “You don’t have to read all the books. I read all the books for you, and I’ve pulled out the nuggets from those books. You don’t have to go to all the seminars and workshops and conferences in the world. I’ve already attended all of them and I’ve pulled out the best nuggets for you and you don’t have to make all the painful and costly mistakes. I’ve already made all those mistakes for you. And I’m going to teach you today how to avoid them.” That compression statement early in your presentation already sells the ROI of whatever you’re going to ask them to do afterward, puts you as the authority expert in the room. It’s one of the most powerful statements in any presentation.

Kyle Gray:

Not so great and it really simplifies and gives us a much more direct way to communicate. I also would be remiss, I have to ask you about this again because when you speak there’re many different kinds of speakers. There are speakers that can present a product or an offer and sell it very directly, and then you have this way of talking about products and services, mentioning customers that you’ve worked with and all of these things in a way that really builds desire to work with you go to the workshops or to purchase whatever product you may be discussing at the time. But you do it invisibly. But it’s just because it’s invisible, nobody notices it’s happening to them, but you realize something’s happening when at the end of the presentation everybody’s rushing the stage like the Foo Fighters just came on tour.

Pat Quinn:

Oh, what a high compliment that was. You compared me to the Foo Fighters. Most people honestly do it wrong and most people structure their presentations where for the first 75% of the presentation they’re helping the audience. And then for the last 25% of the presentation, they’re selling the audience. And if you have structured your presentation like that, even if you’re giving away something free and you save it until the end, you’ve structured the presentation wrong because you don’t understand how the human brain learns and work. One of the things the human brain does best is categorizing information. It can tell a story from content.

Pat Quinn:

When it’s listening to a story, it doesn’t listen to the details. It just finds the gist of the story and remembers it. But when it’s listening to content, it listens very carefully for the details, it takes notes on them. Now, the other thing that the human brain can sniff out really fast and categorize really quickly is sales. And so in a presentation that’s structured like most people structure their presentation, the first 75% of it, the human brain is trusting and loving and warm and comfortable. And then when the speaker pivots and says, “Well, I’m so glad you were here today, I’d like to talk to you a little bit about how I can help you in the future when you give me money,” or, “I’d like to offer you this free gift if you give me your contact information.” The human brain can feel that switch too. When the speaker pivots, the human brain can feel it.

Pat Quinn:

Trust me, the speaker on the stage just, and the only one who just got uncomfortable. Now, the audience is too, and from that point on, there’s very little you can do to change the mind of the audience because we’ve gone from a trusting, believing brain to a skeptical objection-raising brain. And to recognize that there’s a line about 75% of the way through your presentation when the speaker makes that and you can’t do much after you cross that line, that’s going to change the mind of the consumer. So instead what we like to say we do is front-load the presentation. Things that normal speakers would do in their offer, we build in higher up, but not in a sales way in what we call embedding. Embedding is, some people call it seeding. I like the word embedding more because that’s actually what it is doing is helping the audience picture what the next engagement would be.

Pat Quinn:

And so if I’m onstage and I want people to engage with me next by giving me a call and hiring me as an expert, then in my presentation when I’m in the content teaching portion of my presentation, I should tell stories not just about people engaging with me next by calling and becoming clients, but about people who were at one of my presentations sitting right where you are now, who then picked up the phone and called me and hired me as an expert, and what that engagement looked like.

Pat Quinn:

The human brain doesn’t do anything that it doesn’t rehearse ahead of time. And so to get the audience rehearsing this engagement up early in your presentation is going to make them so much more likely to act at the end of your presentation. On the other hand if you don’t talk about what you do after the fact at all for the first 75% of your presentation, then you make the pivot and say, “Let me tell you about some ways that I help people,” the human brain switches, and now instead of trusting you, believing you and taking notes on what you do to help people they are listing with a skeptical brain, a brain and they’re raising their own objections.

Pat Quinn:

This can be as simple, Kyle, as referring to yourself by your first name in conversation. A couple of times in every presentation you should say, “Hey, you know people come up to me all the time and ask Pat, ‘What’s the best way to begin your presentation?’ And my answer is a story. Let me teach you how to tell that story.” Content, content, content, content. What did I do there? I referred to myself by my first name in conversation and said, “People come to me and say, ‘Pat, what do we do about this?'” Or, “I was taking my garbage cans down to the end of the street the other day and the neighbor was taking his down to and he shouted across the crossing yard, ‘Pat is today the day we put out recycling?'” And I said, “No, that’s next week.” Again, there I did it again. I referred to myself by my first name in conversation.

Pat Quinn:

You do that two times during the course of your presentation when you’re telling your stories, anytime during the presentation, and the audience will immediately begin rehearsing having conversations with you in their head. And if you’re one of those people who walks off stage and you’d like people to come up and talk to you or ask you questions if normally one or two people do that and you switch to this technique, you’re going to have a half dozen or a dozen people. Most speakers who try this tell me that it has five times or 10 times the number of people who come up and talk to them after their presentations right in the room. Why? Because they were rehearsing, having those conversations with you all during your presentation.

Pat Quinn:

So the art of embedding, not to ask for the sale a bunch of times during your presentation, but to paint a picture of what that next engagement looks like. And so if you’re giving something away, tell stories about people who asked for that free item and started using it. If you’re signing people up for a course, all of your stories and the content portion of your presentation should be about people who’ve signed up for that course and are having good results. If you have an event, it should be about people who’ve come to an event. That’s the art of embedding.

Pat Quinn:

One of the people who came to our presentation or to our workshop in Milwaukee, it was Nicholas Kusmich and this was the one thing that Nicholas wasn’t doing. He’s a great speaker, but he wasn’t converting at a really high rate on his online course during the course of his presentation. So all we had him do was embed two times once in the beginning, once at the end of his content that the people who he was talking about had taken his online course. Early in his presentation, he talks about, he teaches Facebook ads and he has a Facebook ads course. He was talking about how to pick your image for your ad and he told the story of Mary, someone who’d taken his online course who asked him this question and he taught content, content, content.

Pat Quinn:

Later in this presentation, he was talking about trimming your audience so that you spend less on your ads. And he tells a story about Richard. He just didn’t mention that Richard had taken his course. So he said Richard was somebody who was on a webinar just like this, and he signed up for the course. So Richard was somebody who’d been in a presentation just like this. And he signed up for my course. And this is what he asked, content, content, content, content. In the end, his conversion rate went from 5% to 39% on the same course and the same offer.

Pat Quinn:

It’s amazing what embedding can do because you give people the opportunity to rehearse that engagement with you. And so that’s the sort of thing that we recommend everybody do is engage how they want the audience or embed how they want the audience to engage with them next.

Kyle Gray:

This is so powerful and I hope everybody listening is really grasping this because I think a lot of the people that I’ve spoken with kind of in email’s, listeners here, a big challenge has always been sales and it feels icky like you were saying to just whether you’re on stage or just in a one-on-one conversation or an enrollment call to try, and get people to do this. And you’ve just given the most incredible tool to whether you are in a one-on-one conversation, an enrollment call on a podcast interview, speaking from the stage or a webinar, how, a very easy way to talk about what you do and to build desire for it without being pushy or salesy.

Pat Quinn:

Oh, it’s not salesy at all. One of our core beliefs is there’s nothing you can do in the last 10 minutes of your presentation that will make up for the things you didn’t do in the first 30 minutes of your presentation. And if you’re worried about being salesy at the end, you’re thinking about your presentation the wrong way. You’re just structuring it the wrong way. And you want to take all those things that you want to teach the audience in the last 10 minutes and find ways to integrate them with your content in the first 30 minutes. And the presentation’s going to feel different, you’re going to feel different, your sales are going to go up yet the audience isn’t even going to know why they want these products.

Kyle Gray:

So one of the best things about everything you’ve shared, I mentioned it about this last one, is that these can be applied in many different arena’s in many different formats, and you do a great job at teaching some different ways to apply these ideas in a webinar versus speaking or speaking from a stage. You’ve given us a lot of examples of what this would look like speaking as a presenter. Can you tell us some of the differences between how to use these tools in an online versus an offline format?

Pat Quinn:

Absolutely, so the structure that we talk about opening with stories about yourself, the middle section, teaching content and telling stories that teach content and the closing section, where are you actually teach into a specific emotion that goes across formats. So whether you’re giving a 45 minute keynote presentation from the stage, whether you’re giving a full-day workshop or a breakout session, whether you’re online, doing a webinar, in a podcast or doing a summit of some sort, in a five minute interview or a one on one conversation across the table at Starbucks, you should always start by telling stories about yourself first, then and your content, and then lead them into a specific emotion.

Pat Quinn:

Online a couple of things change. One of the things that change is the feedback from the audience. The feedback isn’t as obvious. One of my tips from live speakers, anytime you stand up and speak live, you should have video running, you should have a camera running. But here’s my tip. Don’t have the camera facing you. Turn the camera around, film the audience instead. And you will learn so fast what the best parts of your presentation are and what the worst parts of your presentation are. You’ll see which parts engage the audience and which parts don’t engage the audience.

[bctt tweet=”To gain feedback from your audience, take a video of your presentation with the camera filming the audience, capturing their engagement. -Pat Quinn” username=”kylethegray”]

Pat Quinn:

Well, that’s much harder to do when you’re online. You can’t see the audience. You say, “Well, I can replicate that by saying, “Everybody type their favorite thing into the Chatbox,” and we give a thousand people typing things into a chat box right away. But that’s not actually feedback on what’s engaging and what’s not engaging. So my first piece of advice is before you give a presentation completely online, like in a Webinar or summit format, I would give the presentation in front of a live audience, even if it’s five of your closest friends, even if it’s three neighbor kids that you pay 10 bucks to sit and listen to it. Because you have to get some live human interaction to see what parts are boring and what parts aren’t. That’s the first thing is you don’t get the audience feedback.

Pat Quinn:

Second thing is that there are more distractions and visually it’s harder to pay attention to someone who’s small on our computer screen than it is someone who’s live in the room with you. The art of storytelling doesn’t really change, but the art of the visuals does and so on stage, we don’t want you to use a lot of slides. We don’t think the person who’s has a hundred slides in a one-hour presentation is a presenter. You’re actually distracting from your presentation. It’s a crutch, and I tell you the one thing I tell speakers all the time is to stop apologizing for having too many slides and cut 90% of them. We think the right amount to have in a one-hour presentation is probably 10 to 12 slides. Now, that varies. You might have a sequence of four or five slides in a row that teach something really well and that might bump up your number, but we don’t think you need a hundred slides in an hour.

Pat Quinn:

Now, online some of the dynamics change because there’re more distractions and because there’s less to look at because you aren’t going to move around as much because you’re pinned in front of a web camera usually. We do allow more slides there, and we allow more visual slides and have a higher quantity of slides that are changing more often so that people have more to look at. So we allow you to double or triple your number of slides when you go online. So those are some small nuance changes. But I would say, for the most part, the structure of the presentation, the storytelling structure, the purpose of the stories that you tell, and the importance of embedding run across the gamut from online to offline, long-time spans to short-time spans. The only thing that changes is how long you do each part. But otherwise, the structure remains the same.

Pat Quinn:

And the good part about that is once you find a set of stories that work and we had somebody on our two-day workshop in Milwaukee, Danny Brazell, one of the best speakers I’ve ever seen. And he came in and he had good structure but he had a story in the wrong place. He had his most emotional story right in the middle of his presentation and after working with them for two days, Danny had moved that story to the back end of his presentation where the emotion story should be. And it left the audience knowing that they had to take action and he has seen standing ovations and higher conversion rates ever since he did that. That will serve him well in his webinars. That will serve him well in his podcast interviews. That will serve him well online and offline.

Pat Quinn:

And so the beauty of that is you don’t have to reinvent the wheel every time you’re asked to speak. You will never again begin with a blank sheet of paper. Once you get the structure down, it’s plug and play. You may swap out some content for some different content, or swap out one opening story for a different opening story if the audience changes, but you will never start with a blank sheet of paper again. You’ll always have that structure. You’ll always have that starting point. You can adjust it and tweak it, but you’ll always have that in front of you when you sit down to get ready for a new presentation.

Kyle Gray:

That’s so empowering because I think something that can overwhelm a lot of people with speaking and webinars and presentations, which are some of the best ways to sell your products and get new customers having to come up with a fresh talk every time, every event you go to try and fit in or to try and make it exactly what they just asked for, or to do a new webinar every time you try, and sell a product, maybe even the same product, but you’re just trying reading the latest thing and trying new approaches. But having this real formula enables you to give one talk and make a few changes and then you can just use this over and over. I guess I’m making lots of rock star references but like a hit song rather than just writing new music every time you have a concert.

Pat Quinn:

Oh, it changes everything. If you understand the purpose of while you’re telling each story. And then the other thing that I think that great storytellers do and people who are great presenters do is to create contrast. The idea of creating contrast. A contrast in how fast you talk online or offline, on stage or in a Webinar.

Pat Quinn:

If you talk at the same pace the entire time, the audience will never know what’s most important. But if you vary that if you talk fast when you’re telling your stories and then slow it down when you get to the most important parts of your presentation, the volume of your voice should create a contrast. I coach speakers who talk really loud and I coach speakers who talk over a much quieter, but the great speakers create contrast. They talk a little bit louder when they’re telling an exciting story and they can get all juiced up. But when they get the most important parts of their presentation, they drop the volume of their voice just a little bit and you will physically see the audience lean him to hear him more closely.

Pat Quinn:

And with your movement, I coach speakers who move around on stage a lot. I coach speakers who stand very still. But the great speakers create this contrast. They move around when they’re telling stories, they move around when they’re transitioning but when they get to the most important parts of their presentation, they hold perfectly still. They slow down their pace and they drop their volume just a little bit and the audience will know. You won’t have to say, “Write this down. It’s super important.” You won’t have to say, “Hey, you don’t have to say it three times in a row to get people to remember.” Do this, and there will be a giant spotlight on the most important parts of your presentation and the audience will remember them for the rest of their lives.

Pat Quinn:

It is really what separates great speakers is the ability to slow it down and bring a spotlight onto those moments. And actually I was, I think back 20 years to the story that I referenced at the beginning of this interview about seeing Bill Hybels speak. The reason probably that I remember that moment to this day where I can picture what I was wearing and where I was sitting. I can take you back to the seat in the auditorium that I was sitting is because he slowed it down and let us process the story at the same pace that he was processing it in real life. People who tell stories again and again and again, especially if they’ve told the same story a number of times, often forget that the audience is hearing it for the first time. They have to emotionally process it for the very first time, even though you’ve told the story a hundred times.

Pat Quinn:

And so to slow down and have those moments, but that requires something that’s really hard to do. It requires you to have less content. It requires you to have fewer words, fewer words in your presentation so that you have the time to pause. Most people have too much that they’re trying to teach in the time that they’d been allotted to speak. Because of that, they have to keep moving because of that, they talk very fast. Because of that, when they know they should be slowing down to let you process the emotions of the story, they don’t have time to slow down to let you process the emotions of the story because if they slow down, they won’t get to all of their contacts. Once again, you forgot that the person who teaches the most does not win. It’s the person who teaches the right amount in the right way with pauses and an ability to slow down and let the audience process it that will actually get the sale at the end of the day.

Kyle Gray:

That’s great. That’s really good, and again, can be applied in any format and is so simple, but very challenging. Again, coming up to this eternal challenge when I’m working with my clients, 90% of my work is just cut it, cut things down.

Pat Quinn:

Cut, cut, cut. Teach less. Teach less.

Kyle Gray:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). So I think that that is a great, great lesson that can’t be overlooked. Pat, you mentioned a workshop that you work with a few times. Where can we if somebody is interested in learning more about presentations or where can we learn a little bit more about you or I know you host a lot of different events and attend a lot of different events. Where can people engage with and see you?

Pat Quinn:

Absolutely. One of the most common questions we get is, “Pat, will you help me with my presentation? I have a presentation. I know it’s not great, but I use it to grow my business and attract clients,” and the answer is, “Yes.” We help business owners every day grow their businesses through speaking and attract new clients through speaking. And the most common way we do that is through a two-day workshop in Milwaukee where for two days we sit down with you and a very small group of people and help you write your entire presentation. You have opportunities to stand up and practice the presentation. You get feedback. We get video of it. If you’re stuck on parts, like how should I start? How should I close? What should I do to transition here? We write that with you every step of the way. We’re sitting next to you writing that presentation with you and helping you deliver it in the very best way. To learn more about that workshop, you can go to advanceyourreach.com or you can email me at pat@advanceyourreach.com.

Kyle Gray:

Pat, thank you so much for joining us and sharing your wisdom with us today. I really appreciate it and I think the audience is really going to love everything you shared.

Pat Quinn:

Oh, I appreciate the opportunity, Kyle, and It’s always fun to spend time with great storytellers and people who take storytelling seriously. So I wish your audience the very best in their storytelling future.

Kyle Gray:

Brilliant, thank you, Pat. Thanks for listening to The Story Engine podcast. Be sure to check out the show notes and resources mentioned in this episode and every episode at thestoryengine.co. If you want to tell better stories and grow your business with content marketing and copywriting, be sure to download the content strategy template, at contentstrategytemplate.com. This template is an essential part of any business that wants to boost their traffic, leads, and sales with content marketing. Thanks for listening and we’ll see you next time.

 

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