SEP Episode 34: Harry Duran’s Secrets For A Successful And Scalable Podcast

Hello, and welcome to The Story Engine Podcast. My name is Kyle Gray. Today on the show, I have my close friend Harry Duran. I am so excited to have him on the show because he is a master of podcasts, and taking podcast content and repurposing that across all kinds of different channels of social media, and he’s a great systems thinker. I love creating great systems.

 

Podcast

Key Takeaways

[4:34] The important life lesson that enabled Harry to become an entrepreneur

[7:48] How to promote your podcast

[10:40] Interacting with your listeners to grow your business

[12:24] How to use social media effectively for podcasts

[16:21] The importance of captions within video promotions

[18:40] Creating Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)

[21:00] Providing transcriptions of your podcast has many benefits

[27:33] The first steps to take to produce a sophisticated podcast

[29:34] The number one mistake new podcasters make

 

Links and Resources Mentioned in this Episode

Podcast Junkies

Podcasting For Thought Leaders

FullCast

The Ultimate Podcast Launch Game Plan (Fullcast.co/kyle)

Dave Jackson: School of Podcasting

The Podcast Talent Coach

Pat Flynn

Podcast Movement Event

Podfest

Libsyn

Headliner.app

Work The System

IFTTT.com

Zapier

Rev.com

Screencast-O-Matic

Transistor.fm

SimpleCast

 

Transcript

Kyle Gray:

Harry just blows my mind every time he shares his wisdom. I’m really excited to introduce him to you and to have him on this show today. Without any further ado, let’s give it over to Harry. Harry, thanks so much for joining us today.

Harry Duran:

Hey, Kyle. This is a really exciting moment. I remember I think where we were when we started talking about this. We had a little mastermind going. I was prompting you to start one, and I was giving you suggestions for which mic to use. And then you went and finally bought it, and then you started sending me recordings, so to see this come full circle and to see how far you’ve progressed is really, really awesome.

Kyle Gray:

Yeah, definitely. It’s been fun really finding what I really enjoy, what I want to do, and building systems to make the parts that are challenging to me just not something that I need to worry about. There’s been a lot of attempts at starting a podcast like this. It’s cool now looking back about 30 episodes in, or 30 interviews in, and more mini-episodes. It feels easy and fun now, but it was definitely challenging at first, and so yeah, thanks again for all of your guidance in this. But, let’s start the show off properly.

Kyle Gray:

I would like to start by asking a question I ask all of the guests. I would love to hear about a moment in your past, in your history that defined you and really, really brought you forward to who you are today serving the audience you serve and doing what you do?

Harry Duran:

There’s a lot of things along the way. I think one of the stories I like to tell is just thinking back to this … I like to have talks where I start by saying that I used to hear a lot of voices in my head, and a lot of the voices that I remember were early on. My first one being my father who continues to push me to study and go to college. I had a great opportunity while I was still in college that I took and jumped straight into the corporate world, so that didn’t happen. And then I think about the voice of what I call, my corporate godfather, who would just continue just promoting me, and saying, this is a great opportunity for you. He kept pushing me and pushing me. At some point, I had made it to a six-figure salary, and he’s like, “Do you know that puts you in the top 10% of all income earners?” It wasn’t something where I was resting on my laurels, but I felt that I had made it.

Harry Duran:

But, I always had a bit of an entrepreneurial bug. Then in 1999, the dot com craze had hit, and everyone went crazy. Everyone was just leaving their jobs left and right. One of the jobs there was for a start-up of a Latino portal, and being a Latino I thought this was the perfect thing to jump into, and I ditched my job. I cashed out my 401k to zero. I took an unpaid position as VP of operations, which I thought sounded cool at the time. But, needless to say, that didn’t pan out, or we probably would be having a different conversation. And then I ended up going back to work in corporate America, but the bug was still there.

Harry Duran:

A couple of years later I took different jobs in IT, in business. It was a lot of the things that were happening with E-business, in which I thought was interesting at the time. Then lastly, there was an opportunity to go work, of all places, in Atlanta in construction for my brother at the time. He convinced me to move down to Atlanta, and actually a hard hat, construction boots, climbing scaffolds, reading blueprints. It was something that I had never done before, but I thought it was exciting to do. I went to try that for two years. I came back with my tail between my legs. I was living with my parents at 34, and I was just like wow, how did I get to this point where I was listening to everyone else’s voices while ignoring my own.

Harry Duran:

I think a lot of people here probably can relate to that. How often do we listen to other people because we think they know what’s best for us, or we think that they have the opportunity for whose coattails we can ride? We have to sometimes learn the hard way that sometimes we have to make our own fortunes and make our own futures. And so, that was just a key moment for me to just realize I need to start doing my own thing. I’ve been a fan of electronic music for a long time. I build a mobile app early on in 2012 called KnowYourDJ.

Harry Duran:

I went to the New Media Expo in 2014. That’s where I had the podcasting bug, and I saw all these other podcasters. Just the long story about how I got to podcasting is I saw people like Amy Porterfield, and Pat Flynn there. I started a show called Podcast Junkies. That’s been running since 2014, 188 episodes so far. It’s been an amazing, amazing connection into the world of podcasting. As of the time of this recording, your episode was actually slated to go next live, the conversation that we had. It’s been fun to establish a relationship with the podcasting community. As a result of that, I’ve actually built a business now called FullCast where we produce shows for other clients.

Kyle Gray:

What an amazing journey. It’s been fun at least seeing you over the last three, four, five years in that journey. Through both of our love for great processes, great systems are the mutual ground that I think we really connected and resonated on. Me, working with WP Curve, and you running Podcast Junkies Show, and now creating another systematized business that is FullCast.

Kyle Gray:

What you’ve done really well in a lot of these systems that I find stunning is, your ability to take one singular piece of content, usually a podcast because you’re a podcast master, and then create dozens and dozens of other pieces of content with it, which makes it really easy. I think a lot of the challenges that people listening to this show have that are content creators are just making every ounce of their time invested in creation really be valuable and stretch far. And so, I would love to hear a little bit about your system of repurposing, your philosophy of repurposing, and how you do what you do for FullCast?

Harry Duran:

Yeah, it’s really interesting. One of the benefits of having a show is that it became a testing ground for what was successful and what wasn’t. Early on I literally just wanted to get my show out there. I wasn’t that well known in the podcasting community, and I was really nervous about starting a podcast about podcasting because I noticed that there were folks out there that we’re doing it already. People like Dave Jackson whose been podcasting for over 10 years, The School of Podcasting. Eric K. Johnson, The Podcast Talent Coach. The greatest craft, who at the time was The Podcast Answer Man. Now, Pat Flynn had his podcast, The Smart Passive Income. It was just like, who am I to come in? I had to be creative about how I was promoting it.

Harry Duran:

When we think about ways to promote content a lot of times we just literally think how am I going to get people to, in the case of a podcast, listen to this audio? But in my mind, I said, how am I going to get people to discover this show, which is slightly different because when I started to go to podcast conferences, which is the first thing I did, I said, where do people that consume this content hang out? Naturally, if I wanted to get people interested in a show about podcasting I would go to where people gather around podcast. And of course, that would be a Podcast Movement, Podfest, which I’m going to in Orlando this coming March.

Harry Duran:

I made T-shirts. These bright yellow Podcast Junkie T-shirts. Initially, I made 20, or 30. I think last time I went to Podcast Movement I made 100. It’s a bit of an investment, but I handed them out free. I just decided early on I knew enough about podcast cover art that I need to make it very, very basic, and this idea of contrasting colors. I came to realize later, or find out later, that black against yellow is one of the highest contrast combinations, which is why you see it on road signs.

Harry Duran:

But, that’s the Podcast Junkie’s logo. It’s been like that. It’s just the typewriter font against the yellow background, and it hasn’t changed since I launched. As you might imagine, the T-shirts were just these jarring, yellow T-shirts with the Podcast Junkie’s logo. The beauty of having a name like Podcast Junkies is it promotes the show, but also if you are a podcast junkie, a self-professed podcast junkie, you’re gonna want to wear a shirt like that because you’re like, oh, that’s me. And so, they became a hit.

Harry Duran:

I built a little bit of a buzz as I would walk around with, as you imagine, 30 or 40 shirts in my hand. People would just give me a look out of the corner of their eye and say, “Are those free?” I’m like, “Yeah. There are two versions. There’s a free version and a $10 version, which one do you want?” They were like, “Hmm, I’ll take the free one.” I was like, “Well, all you have do is pull out your phones, subscribe to this show on the spot, and just show me it, and then you can have your shirt.” They’re like, “Oh okay, that’s it,” just one by one, you know?

Harry Duran:

A lot of the times podcasters and content creators go, “How do I get 1,000 people to listen to my show? How do I make it to the top product, and all this other stuff? But, I’m just like, “How do I get one person to listen to my show?” I tell this to people all the time. You have to grow your listenership literally one listener at a time. As podcasters, we tend to get overwhelmed with numbers, and trying to hit numbers in the thousands, tens of thousands. We’re all trying to be the next Joe Rogan. But Kyle, if we’re getting 100, 200 listeners to a show, we think, well that’s not a big deal. But we know because we’ve both done them, we’ve spoken on stages, and if you put 200 people in a room, and then we say okay, go speak to those 200 people. A lot of people who were podcasters would really be nervous because there’s like whoa, that’s a lot of people. We lose sight of that when we’re podcasting that we’ve got those many people.

[bctt tweet=”You have to grow your podcast listenership literally one listener at a time. -Harry Duran ” username=”kylethegray”]

Harry Duran:

How many of your listeners do you know by first name basis? I made it a point, anytime I would get feedback whether it’s just a Twitter comment, or someone who sent me an email, and those we’ll call speak bite or someone who would write an iTunes note, but it was just like I was just watching each one of those. If I would go to a conference and people would see me with this shirt and they’d be like, “Oh, I listen to your show.” I would be like, “Wait, where do you … when did you listen to it? What’s your favorite episode? How long you have been a listener?” Just getting that data on them. I was doing that over time, a little at a time.

Harry Duran:

And then obviously I was starting to do the digital outreach as well. That’s the real, the in-person outreach where I would just figure out ways to build the community. That’s the first take away. If you’ve got a show that deals with a subject matter get out of your comfort zone, get out of your basement, and go to the text of events where people who are interested in that subject matter gather.

Kyle Gray:

Simple enough, but really powerful and really incredible. Yeah, personally relevant to me as I’m seeing this show slowly start to grow connection by connection. But, I love that. What I love about that is that it’s a very not digital marketer focused strategy.

Harry Duran:

Yeah.

Kyle Gray:

I think a lot of us these days as people who like to create online content, and a lot of our businesses appear to online seem to limit ourselves to only those strategies, but yeah. Also, a testament to really repurposing what you’re doing in a lot of different ways, not just creating shirts to give away, but creating almost a lead generation tool, or a free giveaway tool out of personal interaction and building systems into that too.

Harry Duran:

Yeah. And then obviously, in the beginning, I was trying to make sure I was everywhere from a digital perspective as well. I like to say that you never like to dictate where your audience is going to be, and so when we create shows for clients we make sure we repurpose their content onto Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, Instagram. In the beginning, I was putting stuff on Google Plus, anywhere that had a platform, Linkedin. Anywhere that had a platform that I could communicate and promote the show. As you know and I’m sure your listeners know, there are people who gravitate and who tend to hang out in one social platform of their choice. There are people who are just gonna love Instagram Stories, and everything. They just like 24/7, their whole life is on Instagram. There are people who are just consumers of content and they like the short feeds of Twitter, so just all their stuff is on Twitter.

Harry Duran:

What I would do in the beginning is make sure that I had a version of the promo for the show that could appear in each content. I went out of my way to actually create the appropriate size images for each of those platforms as well because we can tell when we have, when someone is one Instagram and they turn on the forward to Twitter, or the forward to Facebook filter, or whatever it is, that switch that allows you to repurpose from one platform to another. But, we can tell when it happens because you can see the URL of the previous social media platform in the content, and you can see that the artwork is sometimes cut off because it’s not sized appropriately, right. It’s just these little things that show. Okay, and I understand as podcasters, and as solo casters in the beginning because we’re doing all the work ourselves that we have to try and maximize it.

Harry Duran:

The first step is to make sure you find a platform that’ll give you the most reach. We’ve talked about Libsyn before, which is one of the most popular platforms. It’s the most stable, not that it’s the most stable, but it’s the one that’s been around the most. It’s been around 10 years, and still, a lot of podcasters still rely on it. It’s Joe Rogan and Tim Farris, Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History. All the big shows are on there. But, what Libsyn does really well is in their destination stat you can actually configure all these other places where you can send your show, iHeartRadio. Spotify, Tune In. Then you can repurpose stuff to Facebook. You can repurpose it to Twitter as a post.

Harry Duran:

In the beginning when we’re trying to do it all ourselves let’s use the platforms to our advantage. You can even send stuff to YouTube. They’ll ask you for a YouTube size image. I believe they’ll create an audiogram, or at least just get the audio out there. In the beginning, make sure you leverage those platforms to get it as far and wide as possible. And then, later on, you can start to think about what’s the specific strategy I want when I want to promote stuff on Twitter? What’s the specific strategy when I want to promote stuff on Instagram? What I realized is that because Twitter’s typically, and Instagram is typically a visual medium, we started to think early on of ways we could actually promote audio content on there.

Harry Duran:

And so, many of your listeners may have seen some of these audiograms that are now being published, which is essentially an animated waveform over a static image with an audio clip in it. And so, now when we produce shows we grab a 15 to 30-second audio quip and we create an audiogram. Headliner.app is one of the best tools, a free tool. We’ve been using it almost since they came around. It’s a great way for you to take content, which you create, and what ends up being as your output of a movie. You’ll end up with, I think it’s an MP4 file, and because it’s considered a movie on Twitter you can post to, I think it’s two minutes, and on Instagram up to one minute of actual movie content.

Harry Duran:

And so, in an effort to break up the stream … The life of a tweet is seven minutes or something like that. There’s so much stuff happening. People typically tweet just text, and then the next step up from that would be a graphic. And then the next step up from that would be maybe an animated gif. But, then in an audiogram allows people to see that there’s content happening that’s motion based. And so, they’ll stop and they’ll actually listen.

Harry Duran:

A lot of times I think 80% of people consume these platforms, Twitter, Facebook with the audio off because they might be on a bus, or they might not have headphones on. One of the hacks for creating these audiograms to take it to the next level is making sure you’re always adding captions. Headliner makes this super easy. You can import your text, and it’ll actually caption the audio for you. Then you just have to work with the timestamps and do a little bit of formatting to make it look nice. But, it’s something really powerful because now not only do you have what’s the equivalent of a movie promo, or your podcast episode, but if people who have their audio off can actually stop and consume it without feeling like they have to play the audio.

Harry Duran:

It’s a great way to think about each of the platforms. It’s almost like thinking about what’s the maximum you can do on that platform to promote your show? Linkedin now allows movies as well. Now, obviously, we’re putting audiograms on Linkedin. Looking at each platform as they enhance their features, what can you do in terms of the content you’re originally producing and repurpose it in a way to make the most out of that platform?

Kyle Gray:

Oh, I think that’s incredible. You’ve covered a lot of different things. Audiograms, in particular, has been something I’ve been working on. I tried a little bit with Anchor and tried their nice little wavy transcription videos. Transcription is a little bit challenging still, but I think it’s a really good free tool. We’ve been trying a bunch of others, but the one you just recommended I don’t think we tried that out yet. That’s really, really powerful.

Kyle Gray:

I think somebody who had just listened to this may have been blown away at all of the options, but probably also overwhelmed at all of these things. I would love to hear as somebody who mastered this in their business, this is a regular part of just what you’ve systematized now, how can somebody go about developing those same systems, so that they can get this content repurposed without them having to do it all themselves, or making it as simple and as efficient as possible to do each week?

Harry Duran:

I think early on I realized that I’m a huge proponent of systems, and what I call SOPs, Standard Operating Procedures. If any of your listeners have not read Sam Carpenter’s work, The System, it’s incredible-

Kyle Gray:

It’s the best.

Harry Duran:

Yeah, it’s an incredible book on the importance of systems. A lot of it is a bit repetitive. It’s really a great primer for those who are just getting into it. Find a way to capture … Essentially it’s just checklists of repeatable processes. When you’re just getting started even something simple as Notepad, don’t get too fancy, you don’t even have to go to a Google doc if you don’t want to, but just pull up the Notepad on your PC or MAC, and just start documenting it. Think about it as if you already had a team.

Harry Duran:

Early on, I was lucky enough to have a VA that was helping me with the mobile app. She stayed with me as I started moving into the podcast. But I would create these steps for her to do. I was like, “Okay, these are the 10 things you have to do. Open up Libsyn. Click on this tab. In the field where it says type here, type this phrase,” and I would put that in quotes. A lot of it seems rudimentary in terms of how I’m explaining it, but what I like to say and it’s something I’m sure some of your past guests … I know you’ve had  James Trainco on as well and he’s talked about this a bit, but if they made a mistake it was might fault because I didn’t explain it enough.

Harry Duran:

I always like to say you never want to leave any room for interpretation. It needs to be black and white as possible in terms of what the actual step is, so if there’s a gray area in there and they have to pause and think about what did Harry mean here, then you didn’t write the SOP clearly enough. Just do this and even if you’re just doing it yourself, at least all of the steps yourself and say, if I knew nothing about this process would these steps guide me into all the things I need to do it to promote it on all these different platforms? As you start to build these lists of SOPs they’ll come in handy. When we start to get a little bit of help you can pay someone to help you a couple of hours a week. You can just hand those over and see how well you’ve documented it.

Harry Duran:

And then when you want to take it to the next level and you want to start to automate some of these processes tools like IFTTT.com are really good as a basic automation tool. It stands for If This Then That. It was one of the only players in automation and now there’s Zapier as well, which is really next level type stuff. But, If you’re just getting started, IFTTT.com is free to use, and you can just create simple scripts. Say, if content shows up in this one platform then move it to this other platform, or promote it on this other platform. We’ve tested it out to even repurpose contents on Meeting.com, which is another great platform, in terms of repurposing content.

Harry Duran:

Some of the things we do when it comes down to repurposing is … I’ll touch my repurposing, and then jump back to systems. If you think about the podcast audio, once you have it in audio format it’s very easy to get it into the written word. You mentioned earlier that you do this with transcriptions, so that’s a really great thing to do. use a tool like Rev.com. But, there are also some automated tools. Descript.com is a new tool by the founder of Groupon, Andrew Mason. It’s really fantastic and an interesting tool because you would … And it’s pennies on the minute, so if you just need something that’ll get you close enough, and you’re willing to make the changes yourself, Descript is a great place to start to do automated transcriptions.

Harry Duran:

And then if you want to fix it up, if you actually edit the text in Descript and you delete the word and, it’ll actually delete the word and from your WAV file, and your audio file. It’s pretty crazy, yeah. It’s almost like a visual representation of an audio editor, which is what you want it to create. It’s pretty cool. That’s pretty wild. I’ll give you links for all that if people want to try it out. I think you can get the first 100 minutes, I think it’s the first 100 minutes to try it out. It’s pretty interesting because he wants people to try out the tool.

Harry Duran:

The beauty of having a transcription is not only can you make it available for SEO purposes on your site, but we work with a lot of corporate clients, so coming from a corporate background I was familiar with the idea of white papers. We create now a white paper format. It’s the tweets in the sidebar, and a nice logo for the client, and just put it to a really nice formatted, like a Harvard Business Review looking type document. It’s still the transcription. It’s still the same text. But, it looks really, really impressive.

Harry Duran:

The other thing you can do is if you’re sending your audio to YouTube with a graphic, you can take that transcription and upload it as your captions. I did a little bit of research on this. If you manually load transcriptions into YouTube it gives it more SEO weight than if you were just to automated caption service YouTube because nowadays YouTube will automatically caption your videos. But if you actually manually load them, YouTube realizes that that’s probably more accurate because they’re manually loaded, and they’ll give them more SEO juice, which I thought that was pretty cool. Again, just different ways you can actually take what initially starts out as audio and repurpose it into the written word, in terms of transcriptions.

Kyle Gray:

Just on top of all that, and even back to processes, something I wanted to add in. When you mentioned doing a lot of all written documents, and I recently started doing them with a tool called Screencast-O-Matic. And so, for those of you who are out there, I would hope a lot of people are interested in writing. I think that using a combination of well written processes and good videos, but if there’s a tool called Screencast-O-Matic that’s only $2.00 a month, or something like that, $20.00 a year, and you can record a screen recording and then it’ll create a unique link to that video, so you can just have these little videos inside your standard operating procedures.

Kyle Gray:

I just would be remiss if I didn’t share that in the process discussion right now because it’s made a lot of things really simple. It’s sometimes hard when it’s like I’ve always found I had to add screenshots like, open, click the X here. And then have a dozen screenshots pointing to very specific things. Giving little video has really accelerated that process because you’re seeing all of these things and really at the core of being able to do all of these things really easily, really fast is again, back to those processes.

Kyle Gray:

Everybody just listening to this episode I’d love to record and just write down a list of what you’re hearing Harry say, and then just create processes for each one of those, and then hand it off. You can record, get a decent idea of what this would take to be able to do it effectively, but most of these things don’t take very long. Record quick videos on how to do each of them, and then just put them all into a spreadsheet or something. You can hire somebody very affordable to build. You’ve got a whole PR content team right there.

Harry Duran:

The beauty of that is I think first I always want to caution people that the first person to go through those SOPs has to be you.

Kyle Gray:

Yeah.

Harry Duran: They want to rush to get it handed off to someone, and get it off their plate as quick as possible, but you want to really stress test them and see that they’re working properly. And so, that would be a good thing to do. Yeah. I like Screencast-O-Matic. The URL’s funny. It’s actually Screencast-O-Matic. You don’t see a lot of dashes in URLs these days.

Harry Duran:

The beauty of that tool also is that unlike most video capture tools where you capture the video and you’re stuck with what you have, is it allows you to trim off the front part and the end part of the video, so if you’re waiting a few seconds until you can get the screen right and you’re lining everything up, but you had already started recording, you can trim that part out. And then you can usually let it go a little longer than normal, and then just trim that part back in. It may be the only tool that I’ve come across that does video screen editing. I always actually go back before you save it, and just trim the front and the back, which is actually how I used … what I use it for to create my audio course, my podcasting course.

Kyle Gray:

That’s cool. You’ve created an entire course over audio. I mean that makes sense for the podcasters, right?

Harry Duran:

Yeah, yeah. Well, I did screenshot the part where I needed it screenshotted, so I use Screencast-O-Matic. I have a course. It’s called Podcasting For Thought Leaders. It’s a podcasting course. But, in the beginning, I was just struggling so much because I was trying to do everything in one take showing my keynote slides. And then I would talk over it. We over think this stuff when we’re getting started and that was really helpful.

Kyle Gray:

Wow, lots of fun. We are just about closing out and I just wanted to ask if there’s one place to start with all of this? If somebody just has their podcast going, what is the simplest, and most basic first step somebody could take right after listening to this episode to start putting a lot of these ideas and suggestions into action?

Harry Duran:

There’s a PDF that I have called The Ultimate Podcast Launch Game Plan. And if you go to Fullcast.co/kyle it’ll be there for listening to this show. It’s the six parts … The Six Pillars of Creating a Successful Show. But, just at a high level really what you want to keep in mind is something that we’re both doing. We’re both recording into a decent microphone because it’s an audio medium. There are 620,000 podcasts in iTunes as of the last count. There’s a lot of people who don’t have a lot of time to sift through mediocre content. We’re gonna take your show seriously, and you want your listener to take it seriously then start out with a decent microphone. I like to recommend ATR 2100. There’s another microphone that’s similar by Samsung. It’s the Q2U as well, which is …

Harry Duran:

Those are both great mics. They’re dynamic microphones, which means they’re a bit more forgiving with the environment. They’re also USB and XLR. Without getting too into the weeds with a geeky tech, obviously the USB can get plugged straight into your laptop and you can go right away. And then later on if you had a sound card and an extra large cable, which is what musicians use for gear, it allows you to plug in the sound card to control the volume. Use a great microphone to start. Those are about $60.00, so they’re not going to break the bank.

Harry Duran:

Then host your file on a reliable host. A lot of times people just want to get started. Anchor, I know gets a lot of flack because people are not considering it a legitimate platform. If you’re just testing out ideas I’ve seen people start their show there. Try to understand if they can get into a rhythm and podcasting on a consistent basis, and if you can, if you have the discipline to do that, then that’s a good way to get that started.

Harry Duran:

And then when you’re ready to actually get more mature with your show, then go with a host whose specific business it is just to only host podcast audio. Some early podcasters make the mistake of actually hosting their audio on their WordPress site, which is a huge mistake. Don’t do that. Your GoDaddy, or your BlueHost, or your HostGator is not going to be too happy with that. Host it on a Libsyn. Transistor.fm is a great new site. SimpleCast is a really good site as well. There are so many different options. There’s no shortage of podcasts out there now, so just pick one that you’re familiar with, or that you’ve heard about, and host your audio there.

Harry Duran:

And then try to be consistent because there’s something called podfading where podcasters don’t make it past the first seven episodes because they burn out. Set yourself up for success. Have a plan for what you want to record whether it’s gonna be solo episodes, or interviews. Try to get those lined up, and think about … We always like to tell clients, “What’s the one thing you want a listener to do as a result of having listened to your episode?” Think about that. Don’t waste a listener’s time. Provide value, but also think about what you want them to do as far as the next step to engage with you, especially if you want to use a podcast to build a business.

Kyle Gray:

Amazing stuff. Speaking of podcasts to build your business, you have so much good information about this, and so many great stories of podcasting. Where can we go to learn more about you to check out some of your services on some of the shows that you create?

Harry Duran:

You can go to fullcast.co. And if you want we can also sign up for a free 10-minute consult. It’s something that I’ve recently started adding where people just want to talk about ideas for their shows and ideas on how to start one or improve their own show. We’re doing some audits as well. That’s fullcast.co. And if you want to listen to my show that I’ve been doing for the past four and a half years, head on over to podcastjunkies.com.

Kyle Gray:

Harry, thanks so much for joining us. It’s been a lot of fun.

Harry Duran:

Thanks, Kyle. I’m happy to see you on this podcasting journey, and happy that we’re a podcasting family together now.

Kyle Gray:

Woo. Thanks for listening to The Story Engine Podcast. Be sure to check out the show notes and resources mentioned in this episode, and every episode at thestoryengine.co. If you want to tell better stories and grow your business with content marketing and copywriting, be sure to download the Content Strategy Template at contentstategytemplate.com. This template is an essential part of any business that wants to boost their traffic, leads, and sales with content marketing. Thanks for listening. We’ll see you next time.

 

 

 

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